The Pre-Raphaelites

The Pre-Raphaelites GUIDE TO THE YEAR'S WORK /327 because it didn't meet his conception of perfection is key to understanding his small poetic output, as well as his harshness in critiquing many scholarly works in classical studies, as well as in his frequent denials--of reprinting his poems, of refusing visits. Such fastidiousness connects, too, with AEH's well known habits related to formal dining, as is noted in David Damant's "A Dinner by Housman" (65­73). Another corollary to Pettit appears in H. W. Garrod's "Mr. A. E. Housman" (104­16), a reprinting of a lecture originally delivered in 1928 and published in The Profession of Poetry and Other Lectures (1929: 211­24). Especially interesting and worthwhile is Garrod's detecting a Swiftian strain in Housman's scathing estimates of much contemporary classical scholarship. Moreover, Housman's contempt for his own verse may betray his "fear" of it, reminiscent of Byron's similar attitude, and both react with "gloomy insolence" to their angst because it may have biographical implications. Just as interesting is Garrod's discernment of "sham masculinity" in A Shropshire Lad, which, he submits, may derive from the verse of Robert Louis Stevenson. FLORENCE S. BOOS This past year was unusual in witnessing no book-length studies on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

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Abstract

GUIDE TO THE YEAR'S WORK /327 because it didn't meet his conception of perfection is key to understanding his small poetic output, as well as his harshness in critiquing many scholarly works in classical studies, as well as in his frequent denials--of reprinting his poems, of refusing visits. Such fastidiousness connects, too, with AEH's well known habits related to formal dining, as is noted in David Damant's "A Dinner by Housman" (65­73). Another corollary to Pettit appears in H. W. Garrod's "Mr. A. E. Housman" (104­16), a reprinting of a lecture originally delivered in 1928 and published in The Profession of Poetry and Other Lectures (1929: 211­24). Especially interesting and worthwhile is Garrod's detecting a Swiftian strain in Housman's scathing estimates of much contemporary classical scholarship. Moreover, Housman's contempt for his own verse may betray his "fear" of it, reminiscent of Byron's similar attitude, and both react with "gloomy insolence" to their angst because it may have biographical implications. Just as interesting is Garrod's discernment of "sham masculinity" in A Shropshire Lad, which, he submits, may derive from the verse of Robert Louis Stevenson. FLORENCE S. BOOS This past year was unusual in witnessing no book-length studies on

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 21, 2015

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