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The Name "Nodens"

The Name "Nodens" Notes and Documents The Name "Nodens" J. R. R. TOLKIEN This name occurs in three inscriptions: C.I.L. vii, 138 d(eo) M(arti?) Nodonti, C.I.L. vii, 139 deo Nudente, C.I.L. vii, 140 devo Nodenti . . . donavit Nodenti . . . templum [No]dentis. It may also have occurred in the mosaic C.I.L. vii, 137. Apart from these inscriptions, from the same place and presumably roughly contemporary, there is in early Keltic material no trace of any such name or stem.1 The variation o/u is probably due to divergent attempts at representing in Latin letters a non-Latin sound; the variation ont/ent is probably due to (correct) equation of Keltic -ont with Latin participial -ent.2 The former variation enables us to fix with fair probability the quantity, and hence the prehistoric forms, of the stem vowel. The vowel intended was, almost certainly, long: (ü). Native Keltic words had no ö. Already in the very distant period common to all branches of that group of languages ö had become ä in stem-syllables, and ü at the end of words. The three older diphthongs, au (Latin au), eu, and ou (both old Latin ou, later ü), had, however, coalesced in some common sound http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

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West Virginia University Press
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Copyright © 2007 West Virginia University Press. All rights reserved.
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1547-3163
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Abstract

Notes and Documents The Name "Nodens" J. R. R. TOLKIEN This name occurs in three inscriptions: C.I.L. vii, 138 d(eo) M(arti?) Nodonti, C.I.L. vii, 139 deo Nudente, C.I.L. vii, 140 devo Nodenti . . . donavit Nodenti . . . templum [No]dentis. It may also have occurred in the mosaic C.I.L. vii, 137. Apart from these inscriptions, from the same place and presumably roughly contemporary, there is in early Keltic material no trace of any such name or stem.1 The variation o/u is probably due to divergent attempts at representing in Latin letters a non-Latin sound; the variation ont/ent is probably due to (correct) equation of Keltic -ont with Latin participial -ent.2 The former variation enables us to fix with fair probability the quantity, and hence the prehistoric forms, of the stem vowel. The vowel intended was, almost certainly, long: (ü). Native Keltic words had no ö. Already in the very distant period common to all branches of that group of languages ö had become ä in stem-syllables, and ü at the end of words. The three older diphthongs, au (Latin au), eu, and ou (both old Latin ou, later ü), had, however, coalesced in some common sound

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Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: May 15, 2007

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