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The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion (review)

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion (review) Book Reviews fifty years ago” (CFP). The language used in this Call for Papers with its undefined “us” and sense of agency given the “body of fiction that refuses to go away” in conjunction with the absence of essays by any of the major Tolkien scholars who have published in earlier years confirms one of the most valuable aspects of this journal: the extent to which it shows disciplinary and generational attitudes involved in “canon-build- ing” and how different theories and methodologies will result in a fasci- nating range of critical readings of the same work. ROBIN ANNE REID TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE COMMERCE, TEXAS The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion, by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull. London: HarperCollins, 2005. lxxxii, 894 pp. £18.99 (hardcover) ISBN 000720308X; £7.99 (mass market paperback) ISBN 000720907X. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2005. lxxxii, 894 pp., $30 (hardcover) ISBN 0618642676. Since at least 1960, when Martin Gardner published The Annotated Alice, textual scholars have been preparing annotated editions of major literary works. Tolkien has not been immune: Douglas A. Anderson’s The Annotated Hobbit has become the standard text, and Hammond and Scull’s scholarly editions of both Farmer Giles of Ham and Roverandom contain http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's Companion (review)

Tolkien Studies , Volume 3 – May 9, 2006

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

Book Reviews fifty years ago” (CFP). The language used in this Call for Papers with its undefined “us” and sense of agency given the “body of fiction that refuses to go away” in conjunction with the absence of essays by any of the major Tolkien scholars who have published in earlier years confirms one of the most valuable aspects of this journal: the extent to which it shows disciplinary and generational attitudes involved in “canon-build- ing” and how different theories and methodologies will result in a fasci- nating range of critical readings of the same work. ROBIN ANNE REID TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY-COMMERCE COMMERCE, TEXAS The Lord of the Rings: A Reader’s Companion, by Wayne G. Hammond and Christina Scull. London: HarperCollins, 2005. lxxxii, 894 pp. £18.99 (hardcover) ISBN 000720308X; £7.99 (mass market paperback) ISBN 000720907X. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2005. lxxxii, 894 pp., $30 (hardcover) ISBN 0618642676. Since at least 1960, when Martin Gardner published The Annotated Alice, textual scholars have been preparing annotated editions of major literary works. Tolkien has not been immune: Douglas A. Anderson’s The Annotated Hobbit has become the standard text, and Hammond and Scull’s scholarly editions of both Farmer Giles of Ham and Roverandom contain

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: May 9, 2006

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