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The Kalevala

The Kalevala Notes and Documents "The Story of Kullervo" and Essays on Kalevala J.R.R. TOLKIEN Transcribed and edited by Verlyn Flieger For help in preparing the story and essays for publication thanks go to Catherine Parker, Carl Hostetter, Petri Tikka, and Rob Wakeman. t has long been known from Tolkien's own comments in his letters that that the Finnish mythology Kalevala had a powerful effect on his imagination and his legendarium. Just how powerful is strikingly apparent in "The Story of Kullervo" and the two drafts of "On the Kalevala," all three here published for the first time. Both the story and the essay provide substantial evidence of Tolkien's early enthusiasm for and desire to communicate the unfettered exuberance, the unspoiled pagan quality, and what he called the "delicious exaggerations" of what were to him "wild . . . uncivilized and primitive tales." At the time Tolkien was writing, Elias Lönnrot's compilation of Finnish folk-ballads was a relatively recent addition to the world's mythological literature. Tolkien first discovered the Kalevala through Kirby's English translation in 1911, when he was at King Edward's School in Birmingham. When he went up to Oxford in the fall of that year, he checked out http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

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Abstract

Notes and Documents "The Story of Kullervo" and Essays on Kalevala J.R.R. TOLKIEN Transcribed and edited by Verlyn Flieger For help in preparing the story and essays for publication thanks go to Catherine Parker, Carl Hostetter, Petri Tikka, and Rob Wakeman. t has long been known from Tolkien's own comments in his letters that that the Finnish mythology Kalevala had a powerful effect on his imagination and his legendarium. Just how powerful is strikingly apparent in "The Story of Kullervo" and the two drafts of "On the Kalevala," all three here published for the first time. Both the story and the essay provide substantial evidence of Tolkien's early enthusiasm for and desire to communicate the unfettered exuberance, the unspoiled pagan quality, and what he called the "delicious exaggerations" of what were to him "wild . . . uncivilized and primitive tales." At the time Tolkien was writing, Elias Lönnrot's compilation of Finnish folk-ballads was a relatively recent addition to the world's mythological literature. Tolkien first discovered the Kalevala through Kirby's English translation in 1911, when he was at King Edward's School in Birmingham. When he went up to Oxford in the fall of that year, he checked out

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Aug 25, 2010

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