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Swinburne

Swinburne 340 / VICTORIAN POETRY M. R. Bentley praises the other "Bill" (William Morris) and "Ted" (Ned Jones) for their socially committed ideals and practices, and argues that "The Defence of Guenevere" vindicates "humanity in . . . its intellectual, physical, and spiritual richness and uncertainty." He inserts facing columns with relevant quotations from Kant, Collingwood, and others, and pleads for application to the humanities as a whole of Morris' general definition of a "building worthy of protection" as "any work . . . over which educated, artistic people would think it worthwhile to argue." Jan Marsh, finally, the "discoverer" of "A Friend (Re)Visits South Kensington: From a scribbled manuscript (in William Morris's hand?)" (JWMS 14, no. 3), reviews "Inventing New Britain: The Victorian Vision" (the title of a Victoria and Albert Exhibition in 2001) in the persona of a skeptical and sometimes aggrieved William Morris: "The first crafted object my gaze lighted upon [for example] was a huge silver-gilt epergne designed by the Consort, depicting a variety of dogs and their dead victims,--hares, rats and so forth. A more horrible item can scarcely be imagined; or rather, a more horrible waste of high workmanship." The revenant "Morris" wryly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
Publisher site
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Abstract

340 / VICTORIAN POETRY M. R. Bentley praises the other "Bill" (William Morris) and "Ted" (Ned Jones) for their socially committed ideals and practices, and argues that "The Defence of Guenevere" vindicates "humanity in . . . its intellectual, physical, and spiritual richness and uncertainty." He inserts facing columns with relevant quotations from Kant, Collingwood, and others, and pleads for application to the humanities as a whole of Morris' general definition of a "building worthy of protection" as "any work . . . over which educated, artistic people would think it worthwhile to argue." Jan Marsh, finally, the "discoverer" of "A Friend (Re)Visits South Kensington: From a scribbled manuscript (in William Morris's hand?)" (JWMS 14, no. 3), reviews "Inventing New Britain: The Victorian Vision" (the title of a Victoria and Albert Exhibition in 2001) in the persona of a skeptical and sometimes aggrieved William Morris: "The first crafted object my gaze lighted upon [for example] was a huge silver-gilt epergne designed by the Consort, depicting a variety of dogs and their dead victims,--hares, rats and so forth. A more horrible item can scarcely be imagined; or rather, a more horrible waste of high workmanship." The revenant "Morris" wryly

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

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