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Source and Comparative Studies

Source and Comparative Studies The Year's Work in Tolkien Studies 2013 paragraphs of the chapter cite Tolkien's Ainulindäle and "Mythopoeia" to buttress Hart's support of this theory of the need for humans to create. Chapter 9 focuses on Christianity's relationship to the literary genre of tragedy. Theologians and literary critics have generally found them incompatible, a position Hart discusses extensively. He then turns to Tolkien's concept of eucatastrophe as a reconciliation of the two. An extended comparison between "On Fairy- stories" and Iris Murdoch's Gifford lectures leads Hart to conclude that while their claims about the way art can offer "consolation" share a common focus, the two theorists diverge strongly by the end. Tolkien's belief is that literature can present a eucatastrophe that conveys a deep imaginative and moral truth about the world, while Murdoch believes that art's impact can only be artificial and illusory. Hart's interest in the connections between theology and imaginative literature does not extend to considering the body of scholarship by Tolkienists who have done significant work on the religious and theological themes and issues in Tolkien's work, such as Patrick Curry, Joseph Pearce, and Ralph Wood, none of whom is cited. Source and Comparative Studies [Edith L. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Source and Comparative Studies

Tolkien Studies , Volume 13 – Dec 14, 2016

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Year's Work in Tolkien Studies 2013 paragraphs of the chapter cite Tolkien's Ainulindäle and "Mythopoeia" to buttress Hart's support of this theory of the need for humans to create. Chapter 9 focuses on Christianity's relationship to the literary genre of tragedy. Theologians and literary critics have generally found them incompatible, a position Hart discusses extensively. He then turns to Tolkien's concept of eucatastrophe as a reconciliation of the two. An extended comparison between "On Fairy- stories" and Iris Murdoch's Gifford lectures leads Hart to conclude that while their claims about the way art can offer "consolation" share a common focus, the two theorists diverge strongly by the end. Tolkien's belief is that literature can present a eucatastrophe that conveys a deep imaginative and moral truth about the world, while Murdoch believes that art's impact can only be artificial and illusory. Hart's interest in the connections between theology and imaginative literature does not extend to considering the body of scholarship by Tolkienists who have done significant work on the religious and theological themes and issues in Tolkien's work, such as Patrick Curry, Joseph Pearce, and Ralph Wood, none of whom is cited. Source and Comparative Studies [Edith L.

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Dec 14, 2016

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