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Should the Middle Ages Be Abolished?

Should the Middle Ages Be Abolished? Chapter 1 Should the Middle Ages Be Abolished? Alexander Murray University College, Oxford Medievalists who want to open up questions about "periods and boundaries" can do so with confidence that their material will not run out. The thousandyear-long, continent-wide world which we medievalists claim as ours is so full of awakenings, consolidations, collapses, movements, declines, reawakenings, and all the other buffers and points which articulate the historical model railway, that we can debate forever, without going outside the medieval period at all, just how and when these awakenings (and so on) began and ended. But any questions we put about these must be overshadowed by a greater one, about the "Middle Ages" as such. Was there really such a period? Are the "Middle Ages" what Ockham would have called a mere nomen as distinct from a res? Are they a mere mind-set (as we might put it), as distinct from an entity really there in history wie es eigentlich gewesen? And if so, in the interests of getting at that history, should the concept of "the Middle Ages" go? That is the question I shall address in this paper. It is more than a question: it is a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Essays in Medieval Studies West Virginia University Press

Should the Middle Ages Be Abolished?

Essays in Medieval Studies , Volume 21 (1) – Mar 31, 2004

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Illinois Medieval Association.
ISSN
1538-4608
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Chapter 1 Should the Middle Ages Be Abolished? Alexander Murray University College, Oxford Medievalists who want to open up questions about "periods and boundaries" can do so with confidence that their material will not run out. The thousandyear-long, continent-wide world which we medievalists claim as ours is so full of awakenings, consolidations, collapses, movements, declines, reawakenings, and all the other buffers and points which articulate the historical model railway, that we can debate forever, without going outside the medieval period at all, just how and when these awakenings (and so on) began and ended. But any questions we put about these must be overshadowed by a greater one, about the "Middle Ages" as such. Was there really such a period? Are the "Middle Ages" what Ockham would have called a mere nomen as distinct from a res? Are they a mere mind-set (as we might put it), as distinct from an entity really there in history wie es eigentlich gewesen? And if so, in the interests of getting at that history, should the concept of "the Middle Ages" go? That is the question I shall address in this paper. It is more than a question: it is a

Journal

Essays in Medieval StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Mar 31, 2004

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