Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign (review)

Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign (review) West Virginia History, N.S. 2, No.1, Spring 2008 (99, 134), "1962" for "1862" (125), and "canon" for "cannon" (151). These are minor deficiencies in what is otherwise a fine addition to West Virginia Civil War literature, the author smoothly navigating the complex currents and shifting eddies of statehood and Reconstruction-era politics. West Virginia historians are in general agreement that support for statehood was strongest in northwestern Virginia, where the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and the National Road transformed the Ohio Valley's economy. Support for the Confederacy was conversely strongest in the Greenbrier and New River Valleys, though there were Confederate troops raised in Wheeling as the secession crisis turned into armed conflict. Therefore Shaffer's analysis of the contested central West Virginia country is welcome and his conclusions promising, though the small sample size begs for additional similar rigorous study of other counties before his results are persuasive. C. Stuart McGehee West Virginia State University Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign. By Kent Masterson Brown. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005. Pp. xv, 534.) What did Robert E. Lee do following the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg, and how did he do it? What were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies West Virginia University Press

Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign (review)

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Abstract

West Virginia History, N.S. 2, No.1, Spring 2008 (99, 134), "1962" for "1862" (125), and "canon" for "cannon" (151). These are minor deficiencies in what is otherwise a fine addition to West Virginia Civil War literature, the author smoothly navigating the complex currents and shifting eddies of statehood and Reconstruction-era politics. West Virginia historians are in general agreement that support for statehood was strongest in northwestern Virginia, where the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and the National Road transformed the Ohio Valley's economy. Support for the Confederacy was conversely strongest in the Greenbrier and New River Valleys, though there were Confederate troops raised in Wheeling as the secession crisis turned into armed conflict. Therefore Shaffer's analysis of the contested central West Virginia country is welcome and his conclusions promising, though the small sample size begs for additional similar rigorous study of other counties before his results are persuasive. C. Stuart McGehee West Virginia State University Retreat from Gettysburg: Lee, Logistics, and the Pennsylvania Campaign. By Kent Masterson Brown. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2005. Pp. xv, 534.) What did Robert E. Lee do following the Confederate defeat at Gettysburg, and how did he do it? What were

Journal

West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Aug 9, 2008

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