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Reconsidering Tolkien (review)

Reconsidering Tolkien (review) Book Reviews makes a point of using accessible language and avoiding difficult termi- nology, and also chooses to leave aside such complex issues as, for ex- ample, the validity and historical background of the terms “Celt” and “Celtic” (which is part of the “Celticity” debate that has been going on for two decades in academic circles). At the same time, however, in some parts of the book the reader feels that simple stereotypes associated with the terms Norse and Celtic are reproduced. This is because it is only in a very few instances that the author explains that while these ideas were still considered valid by academics in Tolkien’s time, they have long since been challenged and they are now only part of unsophisticated popular imagination. On the whole, however, the book is a worthy contribution to Tolkien studies, and an enjoyable read for every Tolkien enthusiast. Perhaps a title that reflected its contents more accurately would have served it better, but that will not diminish the role it will certainly play in the continuing development of Tolkien criticism. DIMITRA FIMI CARDIFF UNIVERSITY CARDIFF, WALES Reconsidering Tolkien, edited by Thomas Honegger. Zurich: Walking Tree Publishers, 2005. 209 pp. $20.75 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Reconsidering Tolkien (review)

Tolkien Studies , Volume 3 – May 9, 2006

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

Book Reviews makes a point of using accessible language and avoiding difficult termi- nology, and also chooses to leave aside such complex issues as, for ex- ample, the validity and historical background of the terms “Celt” and “Celtic” (which is part of the “Celticity” debate that has been going on for two decades in academic circles). At the same time, however, in some parts of the book the reader feels that simple stereotypes associated with the terms Norse and Celtic are reproduced. This is because it is only in a very few instances that the author explains that while these ideas were still considered valid by academics in Tolkien’s time, they have long since been challenged and they are now only part of unsophisticated popular imagination. On the whole, however, the book is a worthy contribution to Tolkien studies, and an enjoyable read for every Tolkien enthusiast. Perhaps a title that reflected its contents more accurately would have served it better, but that will not diminish the role it will certainly play in the continuing development of Tolkien criticism. DIMITRA FIMI CARDIFF UNIVERSITY CARDIFF, WALES Reconsidering Tolkien, edited by Thomas Honegger. Zurich: Walking Tree Publishers, 2005. 209 pp. $20.75

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: May 9, 2006

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