Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Reading the Storer Record: Negotiating Race and Industrial Education at Storer College During the Age of Jim Crow

Reading the Storer Record: Negotiating Race and Industrial Education at Storer College During the... Reading the Storer Rec ord: Negotiating Race and Industrial Education at Storer College During the Age of Jim Crow Douglas Terry n 1904, a notice appeared in the school newspaper of Storer College, a I white- run school for African Americans founded after the Civil War in Harpers Ferry, announcing a change in the printing department. It explained that the school’s trustees had hired W. O. Towns, the proprietor of the local Harpers Ferry Times, to teach students a trade, “the regular newspaper and job work” of a printing oc ffi e. Consequently, the notice stated, he was to move “his entire plant to the college and unite it with the college outt fi ” to set stu - dents up with the task of printing not only his own Harpers Ferry Times but also the school’s newspaper, the Storer Rec ord. The brief announcement about the arrival of Towns, his printing press, and the work students would be doing was, in fact, part of a larger cultural shift at Storer. Established in 1867 with funding from the Freedman’s Bureau, Storer was founded with the mission of educating former slaves and their families. It was, for nearly its first http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies West Virginia University Press

Reading the Storer Record: Negotiating Race and Industrial Education at Storer College During the Age of Jim Crow

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/reading-the-i-storer-record-i-negotiating-race-and-industrial-ouiBdHu3gb
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1940-5057

Abstract

Reading the Storer Rec ord: Negotiating Race and Industrial Education at Storer College During the Age of Jim Crow Douglas Terry n 1904, a notice appeared in the school newspaper of Storer College, a I white- run school for African Americans founded after the Civil War in Harpers Ferry, announcing a change in the printing department. It explained that the school’s trustees had hired W. O. Towns, the proprietor of the local Harpers Ferry Times, to teach students a trade, “the regular newspaper and job work” of a printing oc ffi e. Consequently, the notice stated, he was to move “his entire plant to the college and unite it with the college outt fi ” to set stu - dents up with the task of printing not only his own Harpers Ferry Times but also the school’s newspaper, the Storer Rec ord. The brief announcement about the arrival of Towns, his printing press, and the work students would be doing was, in fact, part of a larger cultural shift at Storer. Established in 1867 with funding from the Freedman’s Bureau, Storer was founded with the mission of educating former slaves and their families. It was, for nearly its first

Journal

West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Feb 9, 2018

There are no references for this article.