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Reading Mental Pilgrimage in Context: The Imaginary Pilgrims and Real Travels of Felix Fabri's "Die Sionpilger"

Reading Mental Pilgrimage in Context: The Imaginary Pilgrims and Real Travels of Felix Fabri's... Chapter 4 Reading Mental Pilgrimage in Context: The Imaginary Pilgrims and Real Travels of Felix Fabri's "Die Sionpilger" Kathryne Beebe St. Hilda's College University of Oxford In the early 1490s, the popular Dominican preacher and pilgrim, Felix Fabri, had a problem on his hands. He had achieved a certain fame in the area around his home cloister of Ulm, Germany, as a preacher,1 a two-time pilgrim to the Holy Land, and the author of written accounts of his journeys. Now the sisters of the Observant reformed women's cloisters of Medingen and Medlingen had asked Fabri to write them directions for a spiritual pilgrimage so that, despite their enclosure, they too might make a journey to the Holy Land, as a contemplative, devotional exercise. But Fabri feared the task would be too difficult. He had already adapted his pilgrimage experiences for three different audiences: his first pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1480 produced the rhymed, Swabian-German Gereimtes Pilgerbüchlein for his secular patrons; his second, longer journey to Jerusalem and Mount Sinai in 1483-84 resulted in the vernacular Pilgerbuch for the noble patrons of his second voyage and their households. Finally, he spent ten years compiling the encyclopaedic Latin Evagatorium for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Essays in Medieval Studies West Virginia University Press

Reading Mental Pilgrimage in Context: The Imaginary Pilgrims and Real Travels of Felix Fabri's "Die Sionpilger"

Essays in Medieval Studies , Volume 25 (1) – Apr 15, 2009

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West Virginia University Press
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Abstract

Chapter 4 Reading Mental Pilgrimage in Context: The Imaginary Pilgrims and Real Travels of Felix Fabri's "Die Sionpilger" Kathryne Beebe St. Hilda's College University of Oxford In the early 1490s, the popular Dominican preacher and pilgrim, Felix Fabri, had a problem on his hands. He had achieved a certain fame in the area around his home cloister of Ulm, Germany, as a preacher,1 a two-time pilgrim to the Holy Land, and the author of written accounts of his journeys. Now the sisters of the Observant reformed women's cloisters of Medingen and Medlingen had asked Fabri to write them directions for a spiritual pilgrimage so that, despite their enclosure, they too might make a journey to the Holy Land, as a contemplative, devotional exercise. But Fabri feared the task would be too difficult. He had already adapted his pilgrimage experiences for three different audiences: his first pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1480 produced the rhymed, Swabian-German Gereimtes Pilgerbüchlein for his secular patrons; his second, longer journey to Jerusalem and Mount Sinai in 1483-84 resulted in the vernacular Pilgerbuch for the noble patrons of his second voyage and their households. Finally, he spent ten years compiling the encyclopaedic Latin Evagatorium for

Journal

Essays in Medieval StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Apr 15, 2009

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