Qenya Noun Structure by J.R.R. Tolkien, and: Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon, together with The Poetic and Mythologic Words of Eldarissa by J.R.R. Tolkien, and: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on J.R.R. Tolkien’s Invented Languages, Omentielva Nelya, Whitehaven, 2009 ed. by “Beregond,” Anders Stenström (review)

Qenya Noun Structure by J.R.R. Tolkien, and: Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon,... Book Reviews its character and makes the poem (again as Tolkien said of Beowulf) "strong to stand: tough builder's work of true stone" (M&C 71). Christopher Tolkien's Foreword notes that R. W. Chambers read Arthur on a train-journey and declaimed him "as he deserves" (10). Certainly the poem benefits from reading aloud, where the voice can impart drama and performance smooth out awkwardness. The structure rides on a rhythm of balanced repetitions, an echoing and reechoing of emphases and key phrases that contribute not a little to the overall effect. As far as it goes it is a very good poem indeed, and the message--again as far as it goes--is that loss is the last companion of desire and both are part of the human condition. The tides of time will determine The Fall of Arthur's ranking in the Tolkien canon. Verlyn Flieger University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Works Cited Gordon, E. V. Unpublished letter to Tolkien, Dec. 18, 1937. Higgins, Sørina. "King Arthur was an Elf!" The Curator, June 21, 2013. Qenya Noun Structure, by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Gilson, Patrick H. Wynne, and Arden R. Smith, including "Declension of Nouns," "Qenya Declensions," "Primitive Quendian http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Qenya Noun Structure by J.R.R. Tolkien, and: Qenyaqetsa: The Qenya Phonology and Lexicon, together with The Poetic and Mythologic Words of Eldarissa by J.R.R. Tolkien, and: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on J.R.R. Tolkien’s Invented Languages, Omentielva Nelya, Whitehaven, 2009 ed. by “Beregond,” Anders Stenström (review)

Tolkien Studies, Volume 11 (11) – Nov 27, 2014

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163
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Abstract

Book Reviews its character and makes the poem (again as Tolkien said of Beowulf) "strong to stand: tough builder's work of true stone" (M&C 71). Christopher Tolkien's Foreword notes that R. W. Chambers read Arthur on a train-journey and declaimed him "as he deserves" (10). Certainly the poem benefits from reading aloud, where the voice can impart drama and performance smooth out awkwardness. The structure rides on a rhythm of balanced repetitions, an echoing and reechoing of emphases and key phrases that contribute not a little to the overall effect. As far as it goes it is a very good poem indeed, and the message--again as far as it goes--is that loss is the last companion of desire and both are part of the human condition. The tides of time will determine The Fall of Arthur's ranking in the Tolkien canon. Verlyn Flieger University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Works Cited Gordon, E. V. Unpublished letter to Tolkien, Dec. 18, 1937. Higgins, Sørina. "King Arthur was an Elf!" The Curator, June 21, 2013. Qenya Noun Structure, by J.R.R. Tolkien, edited by Christopher Gilson, Patrick H. Wynne, and Arden R. Smith, including "Declension of Nouns," "Qenya Declensions," "Primitive Quendian

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Nov 27, 2014

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