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Perceptions of Gender Differences in the Expression of Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

Perceptions of Gender Differences in the Expression of Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities Few resources identify specific needs and interventions for girls with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). This qualitative analysis asks fifteen teacher and counselor professionals about their perceptions of girls with EBD through semi-structured interviews. Six emergent themes from the analysis are discussed. The results demonstrate that further research is needed in the areas of understanding the hidden nature of girls' issues, girls' minority status in special education, girls' physical behaviors, and girls' unique peer issues. Additionally, issues of the language used to describe girls with EBD and professionals' perceptions of the difficulty of working with troubled girls are considered. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Treatment of Children West Virginia University Press

Perceptions of Gender Differences in the Expression of Emotional and Behavioral Disabilities

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Editorial Review Board, Education and Treatment of Children.
ISSN
0748-8491
eISSN
1934-8924

Abstract

Few resources identify specific needs and interventions for girls with emotional and behavioral disabilities (EBD). This qualitative analysis asks fifteen teacher and counselor professionals about their perceptions of girls with EBD through semi-structured interviews. Six emergent themes from the analysis are discussed. The results demonstrate that further research is needed in the areas of understanding the hidden nature of girls' issues, girls' minority status in special education, girls' physical behaviors, and girls' unique peer issues. Additionally, issues of the language used to describe girls with EBD and professionals' perceptions of the difficulty of working with troubled girls are considered.

Journal

Education and Treatment of ChildrenWest Virginia University Press

Published: Nov 19, 2008

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