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Mothers' and Teachers' Estimations of First Graders' Literacy Level and their Relation to the Children's Actual Performance in Different SES Groups

Mothers' and Teachers' Estimations of First Graders' Literacy Level and their Relation to the... Abstract: The relationship between mothers' and teachers' estimations of 60 children's literacy level and their actual performance were investigated in two different socio-economic status (SES) groups: low (LSES) and high (HSES). The children's reading (fluency, accuracy and comprehension) and spelling levels were measured. The mothers evaluated their own children and 17 teachers evaluated these same children in the same domains. HSES children exhibited a higher actual literacy level than low SES children, and were estimated as having a higher literacy level by their mothers and teachers. Mothers' estimations were higher than those of teachers, and spelling level was estimated as the lowest domain by teachers and parents. Regression analysis showed that the teachers' estimations were the most accurate regarding the children's literacy level in all domains, whereas the mothers' estimations and family SES partially contributed to the children's actual level. Implications of these findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Treatment of Children West Virginia University Press

Mothers' and Teachers' Estimations of First Graders' Literacy Level and their Relation to the Children's Actual Performance in Different SES Groups

Education and Treatment of Children , Volume 34 (3) – Jul 21, 2011

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1934-8924
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Abstract

Abstract: The relationship between mothers' and teachers' estimations of 60 children's literacy level and their actual performance were investigated in two different socio-economic status (SES) groups: low (LSES) and high (HSES). The children's reading (fluency, accuracy and comprehension) and spelling levels were measured. The mothers evaluated their own children and 17 teachers evaluated these same children in the same domains. HSES children exhibited a higher actual literacy level than low SES children, and were estimated as having a higher literacy level by their mothers and teachers. Mothers' estimations were higher than those of teachers, and spelling level was estimated as the lowest domain by teachers and parents. Regression analysis showed that the teachers' estimations were the most accurate regarding the children's literacy level in all domains, whereas the mothers' estimations and family SES partially contributed to the children's actual level. Implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal

Education and Treatment of ChildrenWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jul 21, 2011

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