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Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold GUIdE TO ThE YEAR'S WORk 331 (pp. 1294, 1295); finally, "Reception: The Critical Enterprise" provides a brief overview of the twentieth-century history and twenty-first-century present of Victorian poetry criticism. Expanding their intellectual networks along the lines suggested by the cross-references would lead readers to Ellen O'Brien on "Broadsides" (pp. 177­179), K. K. Ruthven on "Dialect poetry" (pp. 415­417), Charles LaPorte on "Dramatic monologue" (pp. 474­479), Samantha Matthews on "Elegy" (pp. 505­511), Herbert Tucker on "Epic" (pp. 531­538), Marion Thain on "Lyric" (pp. 959­965), Stefanie Markovits on "Novel, verse" (pp. 1206­1211), Florence Boos on "Poetry, working-class" (pp. 1298­1306), Meredith Martin on "Prosody" (pp. 1360­1367), and Marianne Van Remoortel on "Sonnet" (pp. 1585­1591). Each of these entries offers its own set of connections, including to a number of the biographical essays, allowing readers, in the words of the editors, "to find productive and interesting paths" on their way to "connections hitherto unimagined" (p. xxix). CLINTON MACHANN Recent discussions of Matthew Arnold's poetry include two related to "Dover Beach," which remains his most popular poem, and others related to "Sohrab and Rustum," which does not receive a great deal of attention today, though Arnold intended it to be the centerpiece of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
Publisher site
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Abstract

GUIdE TO ThE YEAR'S WORk 331 (pp. 1294, 1295); finally, "Reception: The Critical Enterprise" provides a brief overview of the twentieth-century history and twenty-first-century present of Victorian poetry criticism. Expanding their intellectual networks along the lines suggested by the cross-references would lead readers to Ellen O'Brien on "Broadsides" (pp. 177­179), K. K. Ruthven on "Dialect poetry" (pp. 415­417), Charles LaPorte on "Dramatic monologue" (pp. 474­479), Samantha Matthews on "Elegy" (pp. 505­511), Herbert Tucker on "Epic" (pp. 531­538), Marion Thain on "Lyric" (pp. 959­965), Stefanie Markovits on "Novel, verse" (pp. 1206­1211), Florence Boos on "Poetry, working-class" (pp. 1298­1306), Meredith Martin on "Prosody" (pp. 1360­1367), and Marianne Van Remoortel on "Sonnet" (pp. 1585­1591). Each of these entries offers its own set of connections, including to a number of the biographical essays, allowing readers, in the words of the editors, "to find productive and interesting paths" on their way to "connections hitherto unimagined" (p. xxix). CLINTON MACHANN Recent discussions of Matthew Arnold's poetry include two related to "Dover Beach," which remains his most popular poem, and others related to "Sohrab and Rustum," which does not receive a great deal of attention today, though Arnold intended it to be the centerpiece of

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 7, 2016

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