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Lionel Johnson and Arthur Hugh Clough: An Ironic Debt

Lionel Johnson and Arthur Hugh Clough: An Ironic Debt GARY H. PATERSON A BURDEN OF EASTER VIGIL AWHILE meet Doubt and Faith: For either sigheth and saith, That he is dead To-day: the linen cloths cover His head, That hath, at last, whereon to rest; a rocky bed. Come! for the pangs are done, That overcast the sun, So bright to-day! And moved the Roman soldier: come away! Hath sorrow more to weep? Hath pity more to say? Why wilt thou linger yet? Think on dark Olivet; On Calvary stem: Think, from the happy birth at Bethlehem, To thus last woe and passion at Jerusalem! This only can be said: He loved us all; is dead; May rise again. But if He rise not? Over the far main, The sun of glory falls indeed: the stars are plain. (1888) "A BURDEN OF EASTER VIGIL" IN THE COLLECTED Poems of Lionel Johnson, Ian Fletcher comments that "the title has a Preraphaelite suggestion"1 and cites statements by A. J. Farmer that "Johnson est ici tout près d'Arnold et ces premières verses portent déjà l'empreinte de la souffrance intime qui est la raçon d'un age, trop avide de certitude" and (incorrectly) by A. W. Patrick, who "compares lines 16-20 with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

Lionel Johnson and Arthur Hugh Clough: An Ironic Debt

Victorian Poetry , Volume 40 (3) – Jan 10, 2002

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
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Abstract

GARY H. PATERSON A BURDEN OF EASTER VIGIL AWHILE meet Doubt and Faith: For either sigheth and saith, That he is dead To-day: the linen cloths cover His head, That hath, at last, whereon to rest; a rocky bed. Come! for the pangs are done, That overcast the sun, So bright to-day! And moved the Roman soldier: come away! Hath sorrow more to weep? Hath pity more to say? Why wilt thou linger yet? Think on dark Olivet; On Calvary stem: Think, from the happy birth at Bethlehem, To thus last woe and passion at Jerusalem! This only can be said: He loved us all; is dead; May rise again. But if He rise not? Over the far main, The sun of glory falls indeed: the stars are plain. (1888) "A BURDEN OF EASTER VIGIL" IN THE COLLECTED Poems of Lionel Johnson, Ian Fletcher comments that "the title has a Preraphaelite suggestion"1 and cites statements by A. J. Farmer that "Johnson est ici tout près d'Arnold et ces premières verses portent déjà l'empreinte de la souffrance intime qui est la raçon d'un age, trop avide de certitude" and (incorrectly) by A. W. Patrick, who "compares lines 16-20 with

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

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