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Incorporating Video Feedback into Self-Management Training to Promote Generalization of Social Initiations by Children with Autism

Incorporating Video Feedback into Self-Management Training to Promote Generalization of Social... Abstract: Self-monitoring is a well-studied and widely used self-management skill in which a person observes and records his or her own behavior. Video feedback (VFB) occurs when an instructor videotapes a child's performances and reviews the footage with the child and potentially allows the child to score or evaluate their own behavior. A multiple-probe design across participants was used in the present study to evaluate the effects of self-monitoring during VFB on the frequency of social initiating for three students with autism who failed to exhibit the previously mastered skills upon entering a general education classroom. The frequency of initiating increased in general education settings when VFB was introduced. Data also indicated that initiating generalized across settings and people not previously associated with VFB and were maintained in the absence of VFB for two of three participants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Treatment of Children West Virginia University Press

Incorporating Video Feedback into Self-Management Training to Promote Generalization of Social Initiations by Children with Autism

Education and Treatment of Children , Volume 33 (3) – Aug 22, 2010

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1934-8924
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Self-monitoring is a well-studied and widely used self-management skill in which a person observes and records his or her own behavior. Video feedback (VFB) occurs when an instructor videotapes a child's performances and reviews the footage with the child and potentially allows the child to score or evaluate their own behavior. A multiple-probe design across participants was used in the present study to evaluate the effects of self-monitoring during VFB on the frequency of social initiating for three students with autism who failed to exhibit the previously mastered skills upon entering a general education classroom. The frequency of initiating increased in general education settings when VFB was introduced. Data also indicated that initiating generalized across settings and people not previously associated with VFB and were maintained in the absence of VFB for two of three participants.

Journal

Education and Treatment of ChildrenWest Virginia University Press

Published: Aug 22, 2010

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