Hopkins's Prosody

Hopkins's Prosody Hopkins Quarterly, 38.1-2, published by agreement of the editors in conjunction with Victorian Poetry, 49, no.2, as sharing the common theme, "Prosody." Meredith Martin Princeton University It is impossible to tell the story of twentieth- and twenty-first cen- tury prosodic criticism without mentioning the priest, poet, and prosodist Gerard Manley Hopkins. Is there a history of nineteenth or twentieth century poetics that does not include his sprung rhythm? It was not at all surprising when, after posting a call for papers on "Victorian Prosody" for the journal Victorian Poetry, the majority of submissions mentioned Hopkins. In fact, this special issue of The Hopkins Quarterly is in response to how many scholars of nineteenth-century poetry and scholars of linguistic prosody continue to approach poetic form through Gerard Manley Hopkins's work. But however familiar Hopkins seems to us as the prosodic experimenter, the innovator whose publication history aligned him with modernist poetic experiments, the darling of both literary and linguistic scholars alike, there is no lack of new work on Hopkins's prosody. Indeed, though critical fads come and go (and are reflected in the different ways Hopkins's use of poetic form have been considered by scholars) the fact remains that http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

Hopkins's Prosody

Victorian Poetry, Volume 49 (2) – Jun 9, 2011

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
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Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1530-7190
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Abstract

Hopkins Quarterly, 38.1-2, published by agreement of the editors in conjunction with Victorian Poetry, 49, no.2, as sharing the common theme, "Prosody." Meredith Martin Princeton University It is impossible to tell the story of twentieth- and twenty-first cen- tury prosodic criticism without mentioning the priest, poet, and prosodist Gerard Manley Hopkins. Is there a history of nineteenth or twentieth century poetics that does not include his sprung rhythm? It was not at all surprising when, after posting a call for papers on "Victorian Prosody" for the journal Victorian Poetry, the majority of submissions mentioned Hopkins. In fact, this special issue of The Hopkins Quarterly is in response to how many scholars of nineteenth-century poetry and scholars of linguistic prosody continue to approach poetic form through Gerard Manley Hopkins's work. But however familiar Hopkins seems to us as the prosodic experimenter, the innovator whose publication history aligned him with modernist poetic experiments, the darling of both literary and linguistic scholars alike, there is no lack of new work on Hopkins's prosody. Indeed, though critical fads come and go (and are reflected in the different ways Hopkins's use of poetic form have been considered by scholars) the fact remains that

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jun 9, 2011

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