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Hopkins

Hopkins 320 / VICTORIAN POETRY In a longer commentary, from which I've extracted a snippet, Philip Allingham follows much the same course perceiving, en passant, that the "sheltering door" is wonderfully ambiguous: is it the cottage door, where even the poor can find refuge from the elements, or is it the coffin-lid, which (if the Christian message of eternal life is wrong) at least offers the poor some rest after a lifetime of striving and enduring? To be sure, ambiguity lies at the heart of Hardy's perception of this Christian festival which, itself, celebrates the notion that one man, from Palestine, must die for all the world to live, must re-inhabit his own corpse, his physical body, after death, in order to "save" the human spirit for eternal life. Moreover, in taking on the name of "Easter" Christianity saw fit to appropriate the feastday of the pagan goddess of menstruation and fertility, Oestrus. Ambiguities and ironies abound, indeed. If, in Hardy studies to date, the Past Masters collection represents the finest of textual resources available on CD-ROM there is no doubt that TTHA's POTM--of which the tiny extracts above offer but a meagre sample--provides for the very best of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
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Abstract

320 / VICTORIAN POETRY In a longer commentary, from which I've extracted a snippet, Philip Allingham follows much the same course perceiving, en passant, that the "sheltering door" is wonderfully ambiguous: is it the cottage door, where even the poor can find refuge from the elements, or is it the coffin-lid, which (if the Christian message of eternal life is wrong) at least offers the poor some rest after a lifetime of striving and enduring? To be sure, ambiguity lies at the heart of Hardy's perception of this Christian festival which, itself, celebrates the notion that one man, from Palestine, must die for all the world to live, must re-inhabit his own corpse, his physical body, after death, in order to "save" the human spirit for eternal life. Moreover, in taking on the name of "Easter" Christianity saw fit to appropriate the feastday of the pagan goddess of menstruation and fertility, Oestrus. Ambiguities and ironies abound, indeed. If, in Hardy studies to date, the Past Masters collection represents the finest of textual resources available on CD-ROM there is no doubt that TTHA's POTM--of which the tiny extracts above offer but a meagre sample--provides for the very best of

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

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