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Guide to the Year's Work: General Materials

Guide to the Year's Work: General Materials Guide to the Year's Work General Materials DAVID G. RIEDE As its title suggests, Women and Literature in Britain 1800-1900, edited by Joanne Shattock, takes on a huge, multifaceted topic, especially since, as Shattock indicates in her introduction, the volume is concerned with "the extent and variety of women's contribution to nineteenth-century literary culture in its widest sense" (p. 1). The "widest sense" includes consideration of women as producers and consumers of print culture, as journalists, scholars, teachers, editors, subscribers, and purchasers of literature ranging from poetry to historical and economic scholarship to hack journalism. The volume enlists an impressive array of specialists to provide the best possible analysis of this wide range of topics and offers as comprehensive coverage as could be reasonably expected, but despite the impressive scholarship of the thirteen essays, the book obviously cannot be exhaustive. Still, the combined scholarship and knowledge of the authors does produce a volume almost too densely packed with valuable information. Linda Peterson's essay on "Women Writers and Self Writing," for example, cannot provide the extensive analysis offered by her book on the subject, but does bring to bear her formidable scholarship to provide a valuable overview of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

Guide to the Year's Work: General Materials

Victorian Poetry , Volume 40 (3) – Jan 10, 2002

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
Publisher site
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Abstract

Guide to the Year's Work General Materials DAVID G. RIEDE As its title suggests, Women and Literature in Britain 1800-1900, edited by Joanne Shattock, takes on a huge, multifaceted topic, especially since, as Shattock indicates in her introduction, the volume is concerned with "the extent and variety of women's contribution to nineteenth-century literary culture in its widest sense" (p. 1). The "widest sense" includes consideration of women as producers and consumers of print culture, as journalists, scholars, teachers, editors, subscribers, and purchasers of literature ranging from poetry to historical and economic scholarship to hack journalism. The volume enlists an impressive array of specialists to provide the best possible analysis of this wide range of topics and offers as comprehensive coverage as could be reasonably expected, but despite the impressive scholarship of the thirteen essays, the book obviously cannot be exhaustive. Still, the combined scholarship and knowledge of the authors does produce a volume almost too densely packed with valuable information. Linda Peterson's essay on "Women Writers and Self Writing," for example, cannot provide the extensive analysis offered by her book on the subject, but does bring to bear her formidable scholarship to provide a valuable overview of the

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jan 10, 2002

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