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Guardians of the Valley: Chickasaws in Colonial South Carolina and Georgia (review)

Guardians of the Valley: Chickasaws in Colonial South Carolina and Georgia (review) Book Reviews Guardians of the Valley: Chickasaws in Colonial South Carolina and Georgia. By Edward J. Cashin. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. xii, 196. ) A prolific author of the colonial and revolutionary South, the late Edward Cashin has tackled a subject few would venture to engage: the Lower Chickasaws. This previously neglected band of Chickasaws left their ancestral lands on the upper Tombigbee River in 1723 to settle along the Savannah River, where they remained until the American Revolution. Does Cashin, in looking at a seemingly marginal group of Indians, make a mountain out of a molehill? After all, the Lower Chickasaws could raise only about eighty warriors in 1757, about the same number of gunmen found in a large Creek or Cherokee town. Assessing the Lower Chickasaws' historical importance, Cashin argues, does not rest in their demographics but in their contributions to the early history of South Carolina and Georgia. As "guardians" of the Savannah River Valley, the Lower Chickasaws protected the local Anglo-American population and eagerly warred against Britain's enemies, especially the Spanish in Florida. Equally important, they provided a crucial diplomatic connection to the Upper (western) Chickasaws and other Southeastern Indians. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies West Virginia University Press

Guardians of the Valley: Chickasaws in Colonial South Carolina and Georgia (review)

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1940-5057
Publisher site
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Abstract

Book Reviews Guardians of the Valley: Chickasaws in Colonial South Carolina and Georgia. By Edward J. Cashin. (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2009. Pp. xii, 196. ) A prolific author of the colonial and revolutionary South, the late Edward Cashin has tackled a subject few would venture to engage: the Lower Chickasaws. This previously neglected band of Chickasaws left their ancestral lands on the upper Tombigbee River in 1723 to settle along the Savannah River, where they remained until the American Revolution. Does Cashin, in looking at a seemingly marginal group of Indians, make a mountain out of a molehill? After all, the Lower Chickasaws could raise only about eighty warriors in 1757, about the same number of gunmen found in a large Creek or Cherokee town. Assessing the Lower Chickasaws' historical importance, Cashin argues, does not rest in their demographics but in their contributions to the early history of South Carolina and Georgia. As "guardians" of the Savannah River Valley, the Lower Chickasaws protected the local Anglo-American population and eagerly warred against Britain's enemies, especially the Spanish in Florida. Equally important, they provided a crucial diplomatic connection to the Upper (western) Chickasaws and other Southeastern Indians.

Journal

West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Oct 20, 2010

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