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“Evening-Lands”: Spenglerian Tropes in Lord of the Rings

“Evening-Lands”: Spenglerian Tropes in Lord of the Rings “Evening- Lands”: Spenglerian T ropes in Lord of the Rings Michael Potts harles Huttar, in “Tolkien, Epic Traditions, and Golden Age C Myths,” observes that the sense of diminution or fading is a - n om nipresent mood in The Lord of the Ring . L s ike the lone traveler at the feet of Ozymandias, the reader glimpses ruins and fragments o - f pre vious civilizations of unimaginably ancient greatness, together with the undeniable evidence that even the grandest of civilizatio-ns even tually weakens and falls. This sense of civilization’s “impermanence and inevitable diminution,” Huttar remarks, is “so pervasive i -n Tolk ien’s world as to be one of its defining qualities” (8). As the hobbits traverse Middle e - arth and encounter the relics of past greatness, they experience at the same time a feeling of awe and of profound loss, glimpsing a fading away that transcends merely physical erosion and speaks to the collective loss of learning, wisdom, and spirit a-s civiliza tions decline and eventually dissolve: Even in its latter days the city of Minas Tirith has a g - ran deur beyond anything the hobbits have known, yet they learn that the guards’ http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

“Evening-Lands”: Spenglerian Tropes in Lord of the Rings

Tolkien Studies , Volume 13 – Dec 14, 2016

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

“Evening- Lands”: Spenglerian T ropes in Lord of the Rings Michael Potts harles Huttar, in “Tolkien, Epic Traditions, and Golden Age C Myths,” observes that the sense of diminution or fading is a - n om nipresent mood in The Lord of the Ring . L s ike the lone traveler at the feet of Ozymandias, the reader glimpses ruins and fragments o - f pre vious civilizations of unimaginably ancient greatness, together with the undeniable evidence that even the grandest of civilizatio-ns even tually weakens and falls. This sense of civilization’s “impermanence and inevitable diminution,” Huttar remarks, is “so pervasive i -n Tolk ien’s world as to be one of its defining qualities” (8). As the hobbits traverse Middle e - arth and encounter the relics of past greatness, they experience at the same time a feeling of awe and of profound loss, glimpsing a fading away that transcends merely physical erosion and speaks to the collective loss of learning, wisdom, and spirit a-s civiliza tions decline and eventually dissolve: Even in its latter days the city of Minas Tirith has a g - ran deur beyond anything the hobbits have known, yet they learn that the guards’

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Dec 14, 2016

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