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Doors into Elf-mounds: J.R.R. Tolkien's Introductions, Prefaces, and Forewords

Doors into Elf-mounds: J.R.R. Tolkien's Introductions, Prefaces, and Forewords Notes and Documents Doors into Elf-mounds: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Introductions, Prefaces, and Forewords Janet Brennan Croft olkien wrote many forewords, prefaces, and introductory notes T over his long career, both to his own and to others’ works. This “paratextual” material is often overlooked but is quite interesting in its own right when examined as a body. Writing an introduction f - or an other’s work is what Diana Pavlac Glyer (adopting terms from the work of Karen Burke LeFevre) would call the act of a “resonator”—a form of collaboration (in the broadest sense of collaboration) th-at encour ages, supports, and promotes the work of another writer (68 – 69) and is especially valuable coming from an established scholar sponsoring the work of someone relatively new to the field. In Tolkien’s case, for many of these works he was also an “editor,” even if not acknowledged as such on the title page, who took care to read the manuscript carefully and “offer feedback or advice that result[ed] in very specic c fi hanges” (101), in some instances even working with the author over a period of years. Much of this work was with editions of primary texts, and as Tom Shippey http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Doors into Elf-mounds: J.R.R. Tolkien's Introductions, Prefaces, and Forewords

Tolkien Studies , Volume 15 – Oct 27, 2018

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

Notes and Documents Doors into Elf-mounds: J.R.R. Tolkien’s Introductions, Prefaces, and Forewords Janet Brennan Croft olkien wrote many forewords, prefaces, and introductory notes T over his long career, both to his own and to others’ works. This “paratextual” material is often overlooked but is quite interesting in its own right when examined as a body. Writing an introduction f - or an other’s work is what Diana Pavlac Glyer (adopting terms from the work of Karen Burke LeFevre) would call the act of a “resonator”—a form of collaboration (in the broadest sense of collaboration) th-at encour ages, supports, and promotes the work of another writer (68 – 69) and is especially valuable coming from an established scholar sponsoring the work of someone relatively new to the field. In Tolkien’s case, for many of these works he was also an “editor,” even if not acknowledged as such on the title page, who took care to read the manuscript carefully and “offer feedback or advice that result[ed] in very specic c fi hanges” (101), in some instances even working with the author over a period of years. Much of this work was with editions of primary texts, and as Tom Shippey

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Oct 27, 2018

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