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Dissonant Harmonies: Tolkien's Musical Theodicy

Dissonant Harmonies: Tolkien's Musical Theodicy Dissonant Harmonies: Tolkien’s Musical Theodicy Chiara Bertoglio t the heart of what it means to be a human being are crucial A questions which have given birth to all philosophy: where does the world come from? What is the origin of evil? Why are suffering and death part of our world? Human beings of all times and places have tried to provide many answers to these fundamental problems, and several of these answers are deeply intertwined with religious beliefs. Indeed, once the existence of one or more divine beings is posited, these questions may take a more direct and almost defiant shape: if there is an omnipotent an be dnevolent being, why is the existence of evil tolerated? And why is there such a thing as evil in the first instance? Facing this terrible question, one possible answer is the one we have come to identify with Manichaeism, but which is present i - n sev eral religions and philosophies, regularly surfacing across time and space: the benign divine being is not absolutely omnipotent, but has to contend continually with one (or more) equally divine beings who are entirely evil (or who have some traits we identify as evil, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Dissonant Harmonies: Tolkien's Musical Theodicy

Tolkien Studies , Volume 15 – Oct 27, 2018

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

Dissonant Harmonies: Tolkien’s Musical Theodicy Chiara Bertoglio t the heart of what it means to be a human being are crucial A questions which have given birth to all philosophy: where does the world come from? What is the origin of evil? Why are suffering and death part of our world? Human beings of all times and places have tried to provide many answers to these fundamental problems, and several of these answers are deeply intertwined with religious beliefs. Indeed, once the existence of one or more divine beings is posited, these questions may take a more direct and almost defiant shape: if there is an omnipotent an be dnevolent being, why is the existence of evil tolerated? And why is there such a thing as evil in the first instance? Facing this terrible question, one possible answer is the one we have come to identify with Manichaeism, but which is present i - n sev eral religions and philosophies, regularly surfacing across time and space: the benign divine being is not absolutely omnipotent, but has to contend continually with one (or more) equally divine beings who are entirely evil (or who have some traits we identify as evil,

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Oct 27, 2018

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