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Communities Left Behind: The Area Redevelopment Administration, 1945–1965 (review)

Communities Left Behind: The Area Redevelopment Administration, 1945–1965 (review) West Virginia History, N.S. 4, No. 2, Fall 2010 in the eighteenth century, planters such as Robert "King" Carter combined inherited wealth with keen business acumen to build mercantile empires. Their offspring lacked not only the skill, but also the desire to emulate their parents. Indeed, the dominant characteristic that later planters inherited from their forbears was a taste for expensive British manufactured and luxury goods, items that the twenty-one families spent themselves into oblivion to obtain. Thus, financial profligacy as well as the evolving political environment served to undermine the elite's dominant position in the Old Dominion's public affairs by the onset of the American Revolution. Although Evans's delightful monograph would be appealing to anyone interested generally in colonial Virginia or early American politics, students of West Virginia history would profit from it for two reasons. First, Evans commented extensively on the influence of the West on the erosion of the elite's status in Virginia politics. Second, the men that Evans describes promulgated the land and expansion policies of the provincial government. Decisions made in the council chamber in the old Williamsburg Capitol influenced the settlement of the region that became West Virginia. Matthew L. Rhoades University http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies West Virginia University Press

Communities Left Behind: The Area Redevelopment Administration, 1945–1965 (review)

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © West Virginia University Press
ISSN
1940-5057
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

West Virginia History, N.S. 4, No. 2, Fall 2010 in the eighteenth century, planters such as Robert "King" Carter combined inherited wealth with keen business acumen to build mercantile empires. Their offspring lacked not only the skill, but also the desire to emulate their parents. Indeed, the dominant characteristic that later planters inherited from their forbears was a taste for expensive British manufactured and luxury goods, items that the twenty-one families spent themselves into oblivion to obtain. Thus, financial profligacy as well as the evolving political environment served to undermine the elite's dominant position in the Old Dominion's public affairs by the onset of the American Revolution. Although Evans's delightful monograph would be appealing to anyone interested generally in colonial Virginia or early American politics, students of West Virginia history would profit from it for two reasons. First, Evans commented extensively on the influence of the West on the erosion of the elite's status in Virginia politics. Second, the men that Evans describes promulgated the land and expansion policies of the provincial government. Decisions made in the council chamber in the old Williamsburg Capitol influenced the settlement of the region that became West Virginia. Matthew L. Rhoades University

Journal

West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Oct 20, 2010

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