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Clinical Considerations When Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Treatment For Young Children With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Clinical Considerations When Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Treatment For Young Children With... Abstract: Research on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy, and in particular, exposure with response prevention for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), has only been systematically evaluated in children and adolescents ages 7–17. These treatments do not address the unique characteristics of young children with OCD. This paper discusses clinical considerations for treating OCD in young children (ages 5–8), including cognitive developmental differences, family context, unique symptom correlates, and initial contact with the mental health system. A family-based treatment program consisting of psychoeducation about OCD in young children, parent education, and exposure with response prevention for young children and their parents is described. Issues to consider regarding implementation of this treatment, research with a young population, and future directions for research are presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Education and Treatment of Children West Virginia University Press

Clinical Considerations When Tailoring Cognitive Behavioral Treatment For Young Children With Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Editorial Review Board, Education and Treatment of Children .
ISSN
1934-8924
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: Research on the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy, and in particular, exposure with response prevention for Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), has only been systematically evaluated in children and adolescents ages 7–17. These treatments do not address the unique characteristics of young children with OCD. This paper discusses clinical considerations for treating OCD in young children (ages 5–8), including cognitive developmental differences, family context, unique symptom correlates, and initial contact with the mental health system. A family-based treatment program consisting of psychoeducation about OCD in young children, parent education, and exposure with response prevention for young children and their parents is described. Issues to consider regarding implementation of this treatment, research with a young population, and future directions for research are presented.

Journal

Education and Treatment of ChildrenWest Virginia University Press

Published: Jul 12, 2008

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