Book of the Lost Narrator: Rereading the 1977 Silmarillion as a Unified Text

Book of the Lost Narrator: Rereading the 1977 Silmarillion as a Unified Text Dennis Wilson Wise 1. Introduction In Tolkien's famous essay about Beowulf and the critics, he chides his colleagues for failing to treat the poem as a literary object; they neglect its aesthetic beauty while snuffling around for philological or genealogical data. In a way, I apply much the same point to readers of Tolkien's own 1977 Silmarillion. Christopher Tolkien had once written that he treated the 1977 text "of the same order as the writings published by my father himself" (UT 3), a "completed and cohesive entity" rather than "a complex of divergent texts interlinked by commentary" (1). Christopher Tolkien later distanced himself from this position, deeply regretting that he "attached no importance" to his father's concerns about presentation (LT I xi) and thereby left for The Silmarillion "no suggestion of what it is and how (within the imagined world) it came to be" (xii). Understandably, Tolkien scholars followed this path, discounting The Silmarillion for the much more authenticseeming History of Middle- earth. Additionally, they see the 1977 text, though power ful in places, as a product rife with flaws, uneven in structure and detail, sadly heterogeneous in style, and furthermore marred by the editor's unavoidable hand. I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

Book of the Lost Narrator: Rereading the 1977 Silmarillion as a Unified Text

Tolkien Studies, Volume 13 – Dec 14, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/book-of-the-lost-narrator-rereading-the-1977-silmarillion-as-a-unified-igA2ZgMsOY
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dennis Wilson Wise 1. Introduction In Tolkien's famous essay about Beowulf and the critics, he chides his colleagues for failing to treat the poem as a literary object; they neglect its aesthetic beauty while snuffling around for philological or genealogical data. In a way, I apply much the same point to readers of Tolkien's own 1977 Silmarillion. Christopher Tolkien had once written that he treated the 1977 text "of the same order as the writings published by my father himself" (UT 3), a "completed and cohesive entity" rather than "a complex of divergent texts interlinked by commentary" (1). Christopher Tolkien later distanced himself from this position, deeply regretting that he "attached no importance" to his father's concerns about presentation (LT I xi) and thereby left for The Silmarillion "no suggestion of what it is and how (within the imagined world) it came to be" (xii). Understandably, Tolkien scholars followed this path, discounting The Silmarillion for the much more authenticseeming History of Middle- earth. Additionally, they see the 1977 text, though power ful in places, as a product rife with flaws, uneven in structure and detail, sadly heterogeneous in style, and furthermore marred by the editor's unavoidable hand. I

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Dec 14, 2016

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off