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Back to the Future: Lionel Trilling, "The Scholar-Gipsy," and the State of Victorian Poetry

Back to the Future: Lionel Trilling, "The Scholar-Gipsy," and the State of Victorian Poetry DAVID RAMPTON ow that both a new generation of Victorianists and a group of senior scholars have had their say in the "Whither Victorian poetry?" debate, an outsider's view of some of the issues raised might prove useful. Many specialists in contiguous areas have worked on the poetry and are curious about how it might be studied in the twenty-first century. In what follows, I consider some of the implications of what has been discussed and suggest some background reading for those involved. Given the labor-intensive agenda contributors have set themselves for the medium-term future, it might seem absurd to propose adding to the list of material to be covered and tasks to be performed. Their projected workload is already formidable, particularly because it involves such a range of competencies on the part of those in the newly defined discipline. Creating "a paradigm shift that eliminates the binaries of idealist/materialist, form/content, representation/reference, and, by inference, ontological human subject against non-human world," or reading to see "technology as poetry (and by extension culture as technology)," or extending the boundaries "that an inward-looking, narcissistic, and gender-bound account of Victorian poetry too often adopts" so that "a new intertextuality emerges," or http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Victorian Poetry West Virginia University Press

Back to the Future: Lionel Trilling, "The Scholar-Gipsy," and the State of Victorian Poetry

Victorian Poetry , Volume 45 (1) – Mar 19, 2007

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 West Virginia University.
ISSN
1530-7190
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Abstract

DAVID RAMPTON ow that both a new generation of Victorianists and a group of senior scholars have had their say in the "Whither Victorian poetry?" debate, an outsider's view of some of the issues raised might prove useful. Many specialists in contiguous areas have worked on the poetry and are curious about how it might be studied in the twenty-first century. In what follows, I consider some of the implications of what has been discussed and suggest some background reading for those involved. Given the labor-intensive agenda contributors have set themselves for the medium-term future, it might seem absurd to propose adding to the list of material to be covered and tasks to be performed. Their projected workload is already formidable, particularly because it involves such a range of competencies on the part of those in the newly defined discipline. Creating "a paradigm shift that eliminates the binaries of idealist/materialist, form/content, representation/reference, and, by inference, ontological human subject against non-human world," or reading to see "technology as poetry (and by extension culture as technology)," or extending the boundaries "that an inward-looking, narcissistic, and gender-bound account of Victorian poetry too often adopts" so that "a new intertextuality emerges," or

Journal

Victorian PoetryWest Virginia University Press

Published: Mar 19, 2007

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