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Aural and Written Reception in Sir John Paston, Malory, and Caxton

Aural and Written Reception in Sir John Paston, Malory, and Caxton Chapter 8 , Malory, and Caxton St. Olaf College In an essay entitled "The Pastons and Chaucer," which appears in The Common Reader, Virginia Woolf paints a portrait of the fifteenth-century gentleman, Sir John Paston: For sometimes, instead of riding off on his horse to inspect his crops or bargain with his tenants, Sir John would sit, in broad daylight, reading. There, on the hard chair in the comfortless room with the wind lifting the carpet and the smoke stinging his eyes, he would sit reading Chaucer, wasting his time, dreaming--or what strange intoxication was it that he drew from books? A whole year of days would pass fruitlessly in dreary business, like dashes of rain on the window-pane.... But Lydgate's poems or Chaucer's, like a mirror in which figures move brightly, silently, and compactly, showed him the very skies, fields, and people whom he knew, but rounded and complete. Instead of waiting listlessly for news from London or piecing out from his mother's gossip some country tragedy of love and jealousy, here, in a few pages, the whole story was laid before him. And then as he rode or sat at table he would remember some description http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Essays in Medieval Studies West Virginia University Press

Aural and Written Reception in Sir John Paston, Malory, and Caxton

Essays in Medieval Studies , Volume 21 (1) – Mar 31, 2004

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Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Illinois Medieval Association.
ISSN
1538-4608
Publisher site
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Abstract

Chapter 8 , Malory, and Caxton St. Olaf College In an essay entitled "The Pastons and Chaucer," which appears in The Common Reader, Virginia Woolf paints a portrait of the fifteenth-century gentleman, Sir John Paston: For sometimes, instead of riding off on his horse to inspect his crops or bargain with his tenants, Sir John would sit, in broad daylight, reading. There, on the hard chair in the comfortless room with the wind lifting the carpet and the smoke stinging his eyes, he would sit reading Chaucer, wasting his time, dreaming--or what strange intoxication was it that he drew from books? A whole year of days would pass fruitlessly in dreary business, like dashes of rain on the window-pane.... But Lydgate's poems or Chaucer's, like a mirror in which figures move brightly, silently, and compactly, showed him the very skies, fields, and people whom he knew, but rounded and complete. Instead of waiting listlessly for news from London or piecing out from his mother's gossip some country tragedy of love and jealousy, here, in a few pages, the whole story was laid before him. And then as he rode or sat at table he would remember some description

Journal

Essays in Medieval StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Mar 31, 2004

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