Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“A Particular Cast of Fancy”: Addison’s Walk with Tolkien and Lewis

“A Particular Cast of Fancy”: Addison’s Walk with Tolkien and Lewis “A Particular Cast of Fancy”: Addison’s Walk with Tolkien and Lewis Sister Maria Frassati Jakupcak, O.P. hen the young scholars J.R.R. Tolkien, Hugo Dyson, and W C. S. Lewis “walked round and round the mile-long circuit of Ad- dison’s Walk beneath the avenues of beeches” on September 19, 1931, they talked of everything from “metaphor and myth,” to “Christianity,” to “love and friendship,” and “back to poetry and books”(Wilson 126; Lewis, Letters, 421). As such topics might be addressed in any conversa- tion between bookish men, this does not seem particularly notewor- thy. However, nine days later, Lewis suddenly moved “from believing in God to definitely believing in Christ—in Christianity,” and he claimed that “my long night talk with Dyson and Tolkien had a good deal to do with it” (Lewis, Letters, 425). Since Lewis went on to become what Tolkien called “Everyman’s Theologian,” to those who reverence the Inklings, this particular walk has become an iconic moment of Chris- tian literary history in the twentieth century (Bio, 151). Although Lewis repeatedly mentions talking about story, the conver- sation on Addison’s Walk is mostly read as the seminal moment when Lewis’s tenuous theism was buried under the landslide of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

“A Particular Cast of Fancy”: Addison’s Walk with Tolkien and Lewis

Tolkien Studies , Volume 11 – Nov 27, 2014

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/a-particular-cast-of-fancy-addison-s-walk-with-tolkien-and-lewis-QUekUX0tia
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

“A Particular Cast of Fancy”: Addison’s Walk with Tolkien and Lewis Sister Maria Frassati Jakupcak, O.P. hen the young scholars J.R.R. Tolkien, Hugo Dyson, and W C. S. Lewis “walked round and round the mile-long circuit of Ad- dison’s Walk beneath the avenues of beeches” on September 19, 1931, they talked of everything from “metaphor and myth,” to “Christianity,” to “love and friendship,” and “back to poetry and books”(Wilson 126; Lewis, Letters, 421). As such topics might be addressed in any conversa- tion between bookish men, this does not seem particularly notewor- thy. However, nine days later, Lewis suddenly moved “from believing in God to definitely believing in Christ—in Christianity,” and he claimed that “my long night talk with Dyson and Tolkien had a good deal to do with it” (Lewis, Letters, 425). Since Lewis went on to become what Tolkien called “Everyman’s Theologian,” to those who reverence the Inklings, this particular walk has become an iconic moment of Chris- tian literary history in the twentieth century (Bio, 151). Although Lewis repeatedly mentions talking about story, the conver- sation on Addison’s Walk is mostly read as the seminal moment when Lewis’s tenuous theism was buried under the landslide of

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Nov 27, 2014

There are no references for this article.