Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“A Honeycomb Gathered from Different Flowers”: Tolkien-the-Compiler’s Middle-earth “Sources” in The Lord of the Rings

“A Honeycomb Gathered from Different Flowers”: Tolkien-the-Compiler’s Middle-earth... “A Honeycomb Gathered from Dif fer ent Flowers”: Tolkien- the- Compiler’s Middle- earth “Sources” in The Lord of the Rings Jeremy Painter n the Prologue to The Fellowship of the Ri, J ng.R.R. Tolkien states I that The Lord of the Rings is a reconstruction and compilation drawn from “collections” of “historical books a o nr d r dse ” l c ocated in three main Middle e - arth archives ( FR , Prologue, 23 –25). Although this note was added to the Prologue in 1965, more than a d cade e after The Fel - lowship of the Ring was published, the source structure seems to have been at least unconsciously p en rt d es uring the novel’s construction, and Tolkien’s retrospective note merely realizes and codie fi s what was there all along. Few critics seem to have taken seriously Tolkie-n’s invita tion to read his work as a reconstruction, but, as thi w s p ila l d pee r mon - strate, a reading of The Lord of the Rings as a text consisting of discourses drawn from three identifiable archives sheds new light on the work as a whole. Once the reader http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tolkien Studies West Virginia University Press

“A Honeycomb Gathered from Different Flowers”: Tolkien-the-Compiler’s Middle-earth “Sources” in The Lord of the Rings

Tolkien Studies , Volume 13 – Dec 14, 2016

Loading next page...
 
/lp/west-virginia-university-press/a-honeycomb-gathered-from-different-flowers-tolkien-the-compiler-s-8ojpaL7HG0
Publisher
West Virginia University Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 West Virginia University Press.
ISSN
1547-3163

Abstract

“A Honeycomb Gathered from Dif fer ent Flowers”: Tolkien- the- Compiler’s Middle- earth “Sources” in The Lord of the Rings Jeremy Painter n the Prologue to The Fellowship of the Ri, J ng.R.R. Tolkien states I that The Lord of the Rings is a reconstruction and compilation drawn from “collections” of “historical books a o nr d r dse ” l c ocated in three main Middle e - arth archives ( FR , Prologue, 23 –25). Although this note was added to the Prologue in 1965, more than a d cade e after The Fel - lowship of the Ring was published, the source structure seems to have been at least unconsciously p en rt d es uring the novel’s construction, and Tolkien’s retrospective note merely realizes and codie fi s what was there all along. Few critics seem to have taken seriously Tolkie-n’s invita tion to read his work as a reconstruction, but, as thi w s p ila l d pee r mon - strate, a reading of The Lord of the Rings as a text consisting of discourses drawn from three identifiable archives sheds new light on the work as a whole. Once the reader

Journal

Tolkien StudiesWest Virginia University Press

Published: Dec 14, 2016

There are no references for this article.