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Using Compost for Container Production of Ornamental Hammock Species Native to Florida

Using Compost for Container Production of Ornamental Hammock Species Native to Florida Four hammock species native to Florida were larger with more flowers 8 wk after transplanting into containers filled with compost or media amended with compost when compared with a Florida peat-based control. Our study indicated that compost can serve as a viable alternative substrate to peat for container production of Florida butterfly sage (Cordia globosa (Jacq.) Kunth (Boraginaceae)), firebush (Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae)), scorpions tail (Heliotropium angiospermum (Murray) Britton. (Boraginaceae)), and tropical sage (Salvia coccinea Buc'hoz ex Etl. (Lamiaceae)). Plants transplanted to containers filled with a biosolid:yard waste compost or a formulated compost-based mix (4:5:1, compost:pine bark:sand, v:v:v) grew better than plants transplanted to a commercial peat-based mix, although initial analyses of the medium indicated that compost alone had higher pH; electrical conductivity (EC); N, P, K, Ca, Zn, Cu, Mn, Al, Fe, and B contents; and similar air-filled porosity and C contents when compared with the peat- or compost-based media. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native Plants Journal University of Wisconsin Press

Using Compost for Container Production of Ornamental Hammock Species Native to Florida

Native Plants Journal , Volume 5 (2)

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Friends of Native Plants, LLC.
ISSN
1548-4785
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four hammock species native to Florida were larger with more flowers 8 wk after transplanting into containers filled with compost or media amended with compost when compared with a Florida peat-based control. Our study indicated that compost can serve as a viable alternative substrate to peat for container production of Florida butterfly sage (Cordia globosa (Jacq.) Kunth (Boraginaceae)), firebush (Hamelia patens Jacq. (Rubiaceae)), scorpions tail (Heliotropium angiospermum (Murray) Britton. (Boraginaceae)), and tropical sage (Salvia coccinea Buc'hoz ex Etl. (Lamiaceae)). Plants transplanted to containers filled with a biosolid:yard waste compost or a formulated compost-based mix (4:5:1, compost:pine bark:sand, v:v:v) grew better than plants transplanted to a commercial peat-based mix, although initial analyses of the medium indicated that compost alone had higher pH; electrical conductivity (EC); N, P, K, Ca, Zn, Cu, Mn, Al, Fe, and B contents; and similar air-filled porosity and C contents when compared with the peat- or compost-based media.

Journal

Native Plants JournalUniversity of Wisconsin Press

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