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Transnational Criticism and Asian Immigrant Literature in the U.S.: Reading Yan Geling's Fusang and Its English Translation

Transnational Criticism and Asian Immigrant Literature in the U.S.: Reading Yan Geling's Fusang... W E N J I N lthough the name Yan Geling may mean very little to U.S.­based academics, Yan is often commended by scholars in mainland China and Taiwan as one of the most important Chinese-language authors in the 1 United States. Before she came to the U.S. as a student in 1989, Yan had published three novels in mainland China, where she was born in the late 1950s. During and after her study at Columbia College in Chicago for an MFA in fiction writing, she continued to write in Chinese, publishing award-winning short stories, novellas, and novels in the U.S., Taiwan, and mainland China.2 In 1995, she won a United Daily News Best Novel award for Fusang, a historical novel set in nineteenth-century San Francisco's Chinatown.3 The titular figure, Fusang, is abducted from a village in Guangzhou I thank Paul Breslin, for his perceptive readings of several drafts of this essay, and Dorothy Wang, Betsy Erkkila, and Thomas W. Kim, who provided welcome criticism and advice. I also wish to thank Rebecca Walkowitz and the anonymous readers at Contemporary Literature for their encouraging and constructive comments. 1. In transcribing Chinese names, I follow the Chinese custom of http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Transnational Criticism and Asian Immigrant Literature in the U.S.: Reading Yan Geling's Fusang and Its English Translation

Contemporary Literature , Volume 47 (4) – Feb 16, 2006

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
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Abstract

W E N J I N lthough the name Yan Geling may mean very little to U.S.­based academics, Yan is often commended by scholars in mainland China and Taiwan as one of the most important Chinese-language authors in the 1 United States. Before she came to the U.S. as a student in 1989, Yan had published three novels in mainland China, where she was born in the late 1950s. During and after her study at Columbia College in Chicago for an MFA in fiction writing, she continued to write in Chinese, publishing award-winning short stories, novellas, and novels in the U.S., Taiwan, and mainland China.2 In 1995, she won a United Daily News Best Novel award for Fusang, a historical novel set in nineteenth-century San Francisco's Chinatown.3 The titular figure, Fusang, is abducted from a village in Guangzhou I thank Paul Breslin, for his perceptive readings of several drafts of this essay, and Dorothy Wang, Betsy Erkkila, and Thomas W. Kim, who provided welcome criticism and advice. I also wish to thank Rebecca Walkowitz and the anonymous readers at Contemporary Literature for their encouraging and constructive comments. 1. In transcribing Chinese names, I follow the Chinese custom of

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 16, 2006

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