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Tipped Over Duck Nest Box Traps Turtles in a Restored Wetland (Ohio)

Tipped Over Duck Nest Box Traps Turtles in a Restored Wetland (Ohio) in conventional agricultural systems, with livestock present on the landscape for weeks to months, the disturbance caused by grazing can be intense, even disruptive, as our Boer goat study illustrated (Figure 1). Neither scenario would be expected, according to Connell's intermediate disturbance hypothesis, to support high S. If, however, IRG, which applies intense grazing pressure over brief periods of time, creates a disturbance intermediate between light and conventional grazing, then relatively higher S would be expected in the IRG- grazed landscape. The intermediate disturbance hypothesis may help resolve inconsistencies in the observed impacts of grazing reported in the literature (see Kleppel and LaBarge 2011), and further consideration of this hypothesis would seem worthwhile. Acknowledgments We thank F. Sheehan, J. Mapes, K. Verschoor, K. Kleinpeter, B. Armata, B. Stonacker, A. O'Connor, N. Lewis and J. Kokkinos for technical assistance and logistical support. We are also grateful to C. and S. Newcomb (Newcombs Farm) and D. Lee (NYS DEC Tree Nursery) for allowing us to work at their facilities. J. Bried provided helpful criticisms and comments on the draft manuscript. Financial support was provided by Glynwood Center (Cold Spring, NY) through a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Tipped Over Duck Nest Box Traps Turtles in a Restored Wetland (Ohio)

Ecological Restoration , Volume 29 (3) – Aug 13, 2011

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

in conventional agricultural systems, with livestock present on the landscape for weeks to months, the disturbance caused by grazing can be intense, even disruptive, as our Boer goat study illustrated (Figure 1). Neither scenario would be expected, according to Connell's intermediate disturbance hypothesis, to support high S. If, however, IRG, which applies intense grazing pressure over brief periods of time, creates a disturbance intermediate between light and conventional grazing, then relatively higher S would be expected in the IRG- grazed landscape. The intermediate disturbance hypothesis may help resolve inconsistencies in the observed impacts of grazing reported in the literature (see Kleppel and LaBarge 2011), and further consideration of this hypothesis would seem worthwhile. Acknowledgments We thank F. Sheehan, J. Mapes, K. Verschoor, K. Kleinpeter, B. Armata, B. Stonacker, A. O'Connor, N. Lewis and J. Kokkinos for technical assistance and logistical support. We are also grateful to C. and S. Newcomb (Newcombs Farm) and D. Lee (NYS DEC Tree Nursery) for allowing us to work at their facilities. J. Bried provided helpful criticisms and comments on the draft manuscript. Financial support was provided by Glynwood Center (Cold Spring, NY) through a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 13, 2011

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