Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Thinning Promotes the Restoration of Branch Structure in Second-Growth Redwoods at Redwood National Park

Thinning Promotes the Restoration of Branch Structure in Second-Growth Redwoods at Redwood... as agronomy, soil science, microbiology, bio-chemistry, has become a dominant paradigm for the management of forestry, ecology, analytical chemistry and genetic engi- young second-growth forests throughout northern coastal neering, an integrated approach can be developed to study California (Porter et al. 2007). Restoration efforts usually the functional basis of chemically‒mediated rhizospheric focus on promoting spatial heterogeneity, tree age diver- interactions. Future studies in chemical rhizospheric ecol- sity, multi-layered canopies, and large woody debris and ogy will open new directions for better exploitation of all snags, as they are the defining characteristics of Pacific beneficial soil bacterial communities (methanotrophs, Coast old-growth forest structure. In recent years this chal- PGPR, cyanobacteria, salt tolerant bacteria, etc.). In this lenge has fostered the study of novel thinning techniques direction modern research on ‘omics’ technologies will help to advance the development of old-growth characteristics to develop the plant-microbe based combined technol- (O’Hara et al. 2010, Keyes et al. 2010). ogy for the restoration of sodic soil. The use and release With the current restoration focus on stand structure, of genetically manipulated plants and bacteria should be aspects of individual tree crown architecture are often considered for sodic soil restoration after ecological risk overlooked. Yet, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Thinning Promotes the Restoration of Branch Structure in Second-Growth Redwoods at Redwood National Park

Ecological Restoration , Volume 29 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/thinning-promotes-the-restoration-of-branch-structure-in-second-growth-wHEJxTILo6
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

as agronomy, soil science, microbiology, bio-chemistry, has become a dominant paradigm for the management of forestry, ecology, analytical chemistry and genetic engi- young second-growth forests throughout northern coastal neering, an integrated approach can be developed to study California (Porter et al. 2007). Restoration efforts usually the functional basis of chemically‒mediated rhizospheric focus on promoting spatial heterogeneity, tree age diver- interactions. Future studies in chemical rhizospheric ecol- sity, multi-layered canopies, and large woody debris and ogy will open new directions for better exploitation of all snags, as they are the defining characteristics of Pacific beneficial soil bacterial communities (methanotrophs, Coast old-growth forest structure. In recent years this chal- PGPR, cyanobacteria, salt tolerant bacteria, etc.). In this lenge has fostered the study of novel thinning techniques direction modern research on ‘omics’ technologies will help to advance the development of old-growth characteristics to develop the plant-microbe based combined technol- (O’Hara et al. 2010, Keyes et al. 2010). ogy for the restoration of sodic soil. The use and release With the current restoration focus on stand structure, of genetically manipulated plants and bacteria should be aspects of individual tree crown architecture are often considered for sodic soil restoration after ecological risk overlooked. Yet,

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

There are no references for this article.