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Thinning Promotes the Restoration of Branch Structure in Second-Growth Redwoods at Redwood National Park

Thinning Promotes the Restoration of Branch Structure in Second-Growth Redwoods at Redwood... as agronomy, soil science, microbiology, bio-chemistry, forestry, ecology, analytical chemistry and genetic engineering, an integrated approach can be developed to study the functional basis of chemicallymediated rhizospheric interactions. Future studies in chemical rhizospheric ecology will open new directions for better exploitation of all beneficial soil bacterial communities (methanotrophs, PGPR, cyanobacteria, salt tolerant bacteria, etc.). In this direction modern research on `omics' technologies will help to develop the plant-microbe based combined technology for the restoration of sodic soil. The use and release of genetically manipulated plants and bacteria should be considered for sodic soil restoration after ecological risk assessments. Acknowledgements We thank the Director of National Botanical Research Institute (NBRI) for consistent support. V.C. Pandey also thanks to University Grants Commission for awarding UGCDr. D.S. Kothari Post Doctoral Fellowship. We thank Dr. Brooke Maslo (Managing Editor) for her useful suggestions. References Lal, R. 2002. Carbon sequestration in dryland ecosystems of west Asia and north Africa. Land Degradation and Development 13:45­59. Qadir, M. and J.D. Oster. 2004. Crop and irrigation management strategies for saline-sodic soils and waters aimed at environmentally sustainable agriculture. Science of the Total Environment 323:1­19. Rengasamy, P. 2006. World salinization with emphasis on Australia. Journal of Experimental http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Thinning Promotes the Restoration of Branch Structure in Second-Growth Redwoods at Redwood National Park

Ecological Restoration , Volume 29 (4) – Nov 5, 2011

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University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

as agronomy, soil science, microbiology, bio-chemistry, forestry, ecology, analytical chemistry and genetic engineering, an integrated approach can be developed to study the functional basis of chemicallymediated rhizospheric interactions. Future studies in chemical rhizospheric ecology will open new directions for better exploitation of all beneficial soil bacterial communities (methanotrophs, PGPR, cyanobacteria, salt tolerant bacteria, etc.). In this direction modern research on `omics' technologies will help to develop the plant-microbe based combined technology for the restoration of sodic soil. The use and release of genetically manipulated plants and bacteria should be considered for sodic soil restoration after ecological risk assessments. Acknowledgements We thank the Director of National Botanical Research Institute (NBRI) for consistent support. V.C. Pandey also thanks to University Grants Commission for awarding UGCDr. D.S. Kothari Post Doctoral Fellowship. We thank Dr. Brooke Maslo (Managing Editor) for her useful suggestions. References Lal, R. 2002. Carbon sequestration in dryland ecosystems of west Asia and north Africa. Land Degradation and Development 13:45­59. Qadir, M. and J.D. Oster. 2004. Crop and irrigation management strategies for saline-sodic soils and waters aimed at environmentally sustainable agriculture. Science of the Total Environment 323:1­19. Rengasamy, P. 2006. World salinization with emphasis on Australia. Journal of Experimental

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 5, 2011

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