“There’s no Lack of Void”: Waste and Abundance in Beckett and DeLillo

“There’s no Lack of Void”: Waste and Abundance in Beckett and DeLillo The opposition between Waste and abundance offers itself, arguably, as that which structures contemporary culture more fundamentally than any other. The experience of living in the West today is defined by the perception of abundance, or of superabundance. There is more of everything. When George Bush famously quipped to his supporters at a fundraising dinner during his 2004 presidential campaign that they were the "haves and the have mores," he unwittingly identified a deeper failure in the culture to think of wealth as in any sense limited, or balanced against poverty as its defining opposition.1 There is only having and having more, without the shadow of having less and not having. The physical sign of relative poverty in the West, accordingly, is not malnutrition, not wasting away, but obesity, as if what remains of poverty can only show itself in a weakened resistance to the dangers of abundance. Where the distribution of resources--commodities as well as capital and mineral reserve--has traditionally been understood as an unequal sharing, as balancing the wealth of the few against the poverty of the many, the global economy has produced, and been produced by, the apparition of a wealth without limit, a wealth http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png SubStance University of Wisconsin Press

“There’s no Lack of Void”: Waste and Abundance in Beckett and DeLillo

SubStance, Volume 37 (2) – Aug 1, 2008

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Board of Regents, University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1527-2095
Publisher site
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Abstract

The opposition between Waste and abundance offers itself, arguably, as that which structures contemporary culture more fundamentally than any other. The experience of living in the West today is defined by the perception of abundance, or of superabundance. There is more of everything. When George Bush famously quipped to his supporters at a fundraising dinner during his 2004 presidential campaign that they were the "haves and the have mores," he unwittingly identified a deeper failure in the culture to think of wealth as in any sense limited, or balanced against poverty as its defining opposition.1 There is only having and having more, without the shadow of having less and not having. The physical sign of relative poverty in the West, accordingly, is not malnutrition, not wasting away, but obesity, as if what remains of poverty can only show itself in a weakened resistance to the dangers of abundance. Where the distribution of resources--commodities as well as capital and mineral reserve--has traditionally been understood as an unequal sharing, as balancing the wealth of the few against the poverty of the many, the global economy has produced, and been produced by, the apparition of a wealth without limit, a wealth

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SubStanceUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 1, 2008

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