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The Rapid Riparian Revegetation Approach

The Rapid Riparian Revegetation Approach Loss of native riparian vegetation and dominance of invasive species can have negative consequences for river and floodplain dynamics, trophic interactions, water quality, and riparian systems’ ability to buffer some of the impacts of climate change. In response, restoration and enhancement efforts have increased in scope and scale in recent years, despite the fact that there is limited information on the effectiveness of techniques. This paper describes one approach to riparian restoration and enhancement, termed Rapid Riparian Revegetation (R3), which promotes rapid cover of woody plants in a composition designed to mimic reference site conditions. Limited peer-to-peer learning opportunities and the significant investment in time and resources required to document practices, monitor outcomes and disseminate findings hampers practitioners’ ability to both systematically improve ecological restoration practices and to share lessons learned with broader audiences. This paper seeks to narrow this gap by describing in detail riparian revegetation project planning, management actions, and costs incurred within typical grant funded projects. Initial planting densities prescribed in this approach are typically in the range of 5,400 to 6,400 stems per hectare (approx. 2,200 to 2,600 per acre), with inter-planting in the second year at 1,300 to 1,600 stems per hectare (approx. 530 to 650 per acre). Most sites are established over six to seven years at a total cost of $11,000 to $20,000 per hectare (approx. $4,500 to $8,100 per acre). This approach evolved in and is tailored to Oregon’s Willamette Basin, but principles and practices are applicable to other regions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

The Rapid Riparian Revegetation Approach

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Loss of native riparian vegetation and dominance of invasive species can have negative consequences for river and floodplain dynamics, trophic interactions, water quality, and riparian systems’ ability to buffer some of the impacts of climate change. In response, restoration and enhancement efforts have increased in scope and scale in recent years, despite the fact that there is limited information on the effectiveness of techniques. This paper describes one approach to riparian restoration and enhancement, termed Rapid Riparian Revegetation (R3), which promotes rapid cover of woody plants in a composition designed to mimic reference site conditions. Limited peer-to-peer learning opportunities and the significant investment in time and resources required to document practices, monitor outcomes and disseminate findings hampers practitioners’ ability to both systematically improve ecological restoration practices and to share lessons learned with broader audiences. This paper seeks to narrow this gap by describing in detail riparian revegetation project planning, management actions, and costs incurred within typical grant funded projects. Initial planting densities prescribed in this approach are typically in the range of 5,400 to 6,400 stems per hectare (approx. 2,200 to 2,600 per acre), with inter-planting in the second year at 1,300 to 1,600 stems per hectare (approx. 530 to 650 per acre). Most sites are established over six to seven years at a total cost of $11,000 to $20,000 per hectare (approx. $4,500 to $8,100 per acre). This approach evolved in and is tailored to Oregon’s Willamette Basin, but principles and practices are applicable to other regions.

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: May 6, 2014

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