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The Norwegian Winter Herring Fishery: A Story of Technological Progress and Stock Collapse

The Norwegian Winter Herring Fishery: A Story of Technological Progress and Stock Collapse ABSTRACT: In the 1970s, herring stocks in the Northeast Atlantic were nearly fished to extinction. This collapse is usually attributed to technological advances. We investigate the empirical impact of technological shocks on herring stocks. We show evidence that the power block was the principal factor in the demise of the stock. We also look at the sensitivity of catch to stock size and technological shocks. We measure a significant stock effect in the 1950s, contrary to what we expect. A simulation model indicates that this could have been caused by an increasing range of the fishing fleet due to ongoing technological progress. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Economics University of Wisconsin Press

The Norwegian Winter Herring Fishery: A Story of Technological Progress and Stock Collapse

Land Economics , Volume 91 (2) – Apr 13, 2015

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System.
ISSN
1543-8325
Publisher site
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Abstract

ABSTRACT: In the 1970s, herring stocks in the Northeast Atlantic were nearly fished to extinction. This collapse is usually attributed to technological advances. We investigate the empirical impact of technological shocks on herring stocks. We show evidence that the power block was the principal factor in the demise of the stock. We also look at the sensitivity of catch to stock size and technological shocks. We measure a significant stock effect in the 1950s, contrary to what we expect. A simulation model indicates that this could have been caused by an increasing range of the fishing fleet due to ongoing technological progress.

Journal

Land EconomicsUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 13, 2015

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