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The Impact of Ethanol Plants on Surrounding Farmland Values: A Case Study

The Impact of Ethanol Plants on Surrounding Farmland Values: A Case Study Abstract: The expansion of the corn ethanol industry after 2003 increased corn prices throughout the United States, and, in some cases, prices were shown to be higher with proximity to individual ethanol plants. This leads to the hypothesis that the value of farmland in close proximity to ethanol plants is higher than comparable farmland located farther away. This hypothesis was explored by examining the sale of 961 farmland parcels during 2004-2008, in the vicinity of two corn ethanol plants in northeastern Nebraska. Hedonic models including land characteristics as well as spatial and plant proximity measures failed to show support for the hypothesis. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Land Economics University of Wisconsin Press

The Impact of Ethanol Plants on Surrounding Farmland Values: A Case Study

Land Economics , Volume 87 (2) – Apr 4, 2011

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-8325
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract: The expansion of the corn ethanol industry after 2003 increased corn prices throughout the United States, and, in some cases, prices were shown to be higher with proximity to individual ethanol plants. This leads to the hypothesis that the value of farmland in close proximity to ethanol plants is higher than comparable farmland located farther away. This hypothesis was explored by examining the sale of 961 farmland parcels during 2004-2008, in the vicinity of two corn ethanol plants in northeastern Nebraska. Hedonic models including land characteristics as well as spatial and plant proximity measures failed to show support for the hypothesis.

Journal

Land EconomicsUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 4, 2011

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