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The Effect of Planting Orientation and Iron Ore Mining Substrates on the Survival and Growth of Salix planifolia Cuttings in a Greenhouse Experiment

The Effect of Planting Orientation and Iron Ore Mining Substrates on the Survival and Growth of... <p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The restoration of sites disturbed by human activities often relies on the capacity of plants to propagate vegetatively. Willow cuttings are widely used in such projects. However, few studies have looked at the impact of planting orientation on the survival and growth of the cuttings. The objective of this study was to evaluate, in a greenhouse experiment, the performance (survival, shoot emergence, final number of shoots, biomass production) of <i>Salix planifolia</i> cuttings planted vertically or horizontally on peat moss (control) and on two substrates (overburden and waste rock) from an iron ore mine site in Schefferville (northern Québec, Canada). Overall, cutting performance (survival, shoot production and biomass) was greater on overburden and peat moss than on waste rock at the end of the seven week-long experiment. Horizontal cuttings had a greater survival rate than the vertical ones. However, cutting orientation impact on shoot production appears to vary according to substrate. Both orientations showed similar shoot production on overburden, but vertically planted cuttings produced a greater number of shoots than the horizontal ones on waste rock. These results suggest that vegetative propagation of <i>S. planifolia</i> has potential for the revegetation of abandoned iron mine sites.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

The Effect of Planting Orientation and Iron Ore Mining Substrates on the Survival and Growth of Salix planifolia Cuttings in a Greenhouse Experiment

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

<p>ABSTRACT:</p><p>The restoration of sites disturbed by human activities often relies on the capacity of plants to propagate vegetatively. Willow cuttings are widely used in such projects. However, few studies have looked at the impact of planting orientation on the survival and growth of the cuttings. The objective of this study was to evaluate, in a greenhouse experiment, the performance (survival, shoot emergence, final number of shoots, biomass production) of <i>Salix planifolia</i> cuttings planted vertically or horizontally on peat moss (control) and on two substrates (overburden and waste rock) from an iron ore mine site in Schefferville (northern Québec, Canada). Overall, cutting performance (survival, shoot production and biomass) was greater on overburden and peat moss than on waste rock at the end of the seven week-long experiment. Horizontal cuttings had a greater survival rate than the vertical ones. However, cutting orientation impact on shoot production appears to vary according to substrate. Both orientations showed similar shoot production on overburden, but vertically planted cuttings produced a greater number of shoots than the horizontal ones on waste rock. These results suggest that vegetative propagation of <i>S. planifolia</i> has potential for the revegetation of abandoned iron mine sites.</p>

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 25, 2020

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