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The Commodification of Creativity in the New Labor Era

The Commodification of Creativity in the New Labor Era AMARDEEP SINGH Sarah Brouillette, Literature and the Creative Economy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. ix + 238 pages. $45.00. arah Brouillette's Literature and the Creative Economy takes as its starting point the nagging worry that many creative people with progressive politics have felt since about the end of the Cold War: is it not true that our various forms of creative expression, even those oriented toward critique, can all be appropriated by neoliberalism in support of the market and a state ideology that favors entrepreneurs over organized labor? To address this question, Brouillette offers materialist close readings of a series of Anglophone postcolonial novels that explicitly engage this problematic, often in surprising ways. Brouillette's introductory chapters respond to policy shifts in the British government's orientation to the "creative industries," as well as to ideas from Marxist theorists of the Autonomia school, whom Brouillette shows to be surprisingly aligned with the prevailing neoliberal attitude toward labor. Subsequently, Brouillette devotes several chapters to interpreting specimens of ambivalent creativity in mainly contemporary multicultural British fiction (with a prominent contemporary Indian novel also included, Aravind Adiga's The White Tiger). The key buzzword in this transformation, in both the United Kingdom and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

The Commodification of Creativity in the New Labor Era

Contemporary Literature , Volume 56 (2) – Sep 1, 2015

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin.
ISSN
1548-9949
Publisher site
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Abstract

AMARDEEP SINGH Sarah Brouillette, Literature and the Creative Economy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2014. ix + 238 pages. $45.00. arah Brouillette's Literature and the Creative Economy takes as its starting point the nagging worry that many creative people with progressive politics have felt since about the end of the Cold War: is it not true that our various forms of creative expression, even those oriented toward critique, can all be appropriated by neoliberalism in support of the market and a state ideology that favors entrepreneurs over organized labor? To address this question, Brouillette offers materialist close readings of a series of Anglophone postcolonial novels that explicitly engage this problematic, often in surprising ways. Brouillette's introductory chapters respond to policy shifts in the British government's orientation to the "creative industries," as well as to ideas from Marxist theorists of the Autonomia school, whom Brouillette shows to be surprisingly aligned with the prevailing neoliberal attitude toward labor. Subsequently, Brouillette devotes several chapters to interpreting specimens of ambivalent creativity in mainly contemporary multicultural British fiction (with a prominent contemporary Indian novel also included, Aravind Adiga's The White Tiger). The key buzzword in this transformation, in both the United Kingdom and

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Sep 1, 2015

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