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Survey of Chicago Region Restoration Seed Source Policies

Survey of Chicago Region Restoration Seed Source Policies This study revealed that in spite of the number and Survey of Chicago Region Restoration extent of invasions by A. calamus, there are few references Seed Source Policies to its invasive character in North America. The Delaware Cassi Saari (ecology + vision, llc.,136 Railroad Street, Leland, (State) Native Plant Group (2006) lists A. calamus with 13 IL 60531, cassisaari@gmail.com) and Wesley Glisson (Plant other species, as “widespread and invasive”. A. calamus is Biology and Conservation, Northwestern University, 2205 not readily discernible in the field from other morphologi - Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, wjglisson@gmail.com) cally similar nonnative invasive species such as yellow flag (Iris pseudacorus) and narrowleaf cattail (Typha angustifolia) here to obtain seed for new and ongoing restora- and its hybrids. As a consequence of the failure to publicize Wtion projects is a primary concern for land manag- its invasive character more widely, invasions by A. calamus ers of the Chicago, IL region. Restoration practitioners may go unnoticed for a considerable time (Les and Meh- here face a challenging situation. On one hand, many rhoff 1999). With the clarification of species identity for pre-settlement plant communities are still intact; Chica- Acorus found in North America, we can now http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Survey of Chicago Region Restoration Seed Source Policies

Ecological Restoration , Volume 30 (3) – Aug 2, 2012

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

This study revealed that in spite of the number and Survey of Chicago Region Restoration extent of invasions by A. calamus, there are few references Seed Source Policies to its invasive character in North America. The Delaware Cassi Saari (ecology + vision, llc.,136 Railroad Street, Leland, (State) Native Plant Group (2006) lists A. calamus with 13 IL 60531, cassisaari@gmail.com) and Wesley Glisson (Plant other species, as “widespread and invasive”. A. calamus is Biology and Conservation, Northwestern University, 2205 not readily discernible in the field from other morphologi - Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208, wjglisson@gmail.com) cally similar nonnative invasive species such as yellow flag (Iris pseudacorus) and narrowleaf cattail (Typha angustifolia) here to obtain seed for new and ongoing restora- and its hybrids. As a consequence of the failure to publicize Wtion projects is a primary concern for land manag- its invasive character more widely, invasions by A. calamus ers of the Chicago, IL region. Restoration practitioners may go unnoticed for a considerable time (Les and Meh- here face a challenging situation. On one hand, many rhoff 1999). With the clarification of species identity for pre-settlement plant communities are still intact; Chica- Acorus found in North America, we can now

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Aug 2, 2012

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