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Space and Style in Contemporary British Fiction

Space and Style in Contemporary British Fiction LUCIENNE LOH David James, Contemporary British Fiction and the Artistry of Space: Style, Landscape, Perception. London and New York: Continuum, 2008. vii 195 pp. $120.00. o read in one place is to imagine another. In fiction, settings and landscapes frequently offer verisimilitude but also necessarily create anew even the most familiar of geographies and histories. These specificities preoccupied a range of critics invested in "the spatial turn" of the late 1980s, and since then, philosophical and social theorizations of space have remained central to contemporary thought. U.S.-based cultural geographers and sociologists-- notably Mike Davis, David Harvey, Fredric Jameson, and Edward Soja--largely heralded and headed this turn to space. Functioning at the confluence of psychology, perception, and place, this interdisciplinary movement not only energized progressive politics in Anglo-American academia, but also maintained Marxist-inflected forms of intellectual resistance against the inimical eddies of late capitalism. Across the Atlantic, European critics from the mid twentieth century onwards such as Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, Walter Benjamin, and Gaston Bachelard galvanized critical interest in spatiality through various phenomenological strategies for undermining social institutions and structures of power. These critics' collective theorizations about space were crucial in melding the practices Contemporary Literature 51, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Literature University of Wisconsin Press

Space and Style in Contemporary British Fiction

Contemporary Literature , Volume 51 (4) – Apr 2, 2011

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1548-9949
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Abstract

LUCIENNE LOH David James, Contemporary British Fiction and the Artistry of Space: Style, Landscape, Perception. London and New York: Continuum, 2008. vii 195 pp. $120.00. o read in one place is to imagine another. In fiction, settings and landscapes frequently offer verisimilitude but also necessarily create anew even the most familiar of geographies and histories. These specificities preoccupied a range of critics invested in "the spatial turn" of the late 1980s, and since then, philosophical and social theorizations of space have remained central to contemporary thought. U.S.-based cultural geographers and sociologists-- notably Mike Davis, David Harvey, Fredric Jameson, and Edward Soja--largely heralded and headed this turn to space. Functioning at the confluence of psychology, perception, and place, this interdisciplinary movement not only energized progressive politics in Anglo-American academia, but also maintained Marxist-inflected forms of intellectual resistance against the inimical eddies of late capitalism. Across the Atlantic, European critics from the mid twentieth century onwards such as Henri Lefebvre, Michel de Certeau, Walter Benjamin, and Gaston Bachelard galvanized critical interest in spatiality through various phenomenological strategies for undermining social institutions and structures of power. These critics' collective theorizations about space were crucial in melding the practices Contemporary Literature 51,

Journal

Contemporary LiteratureUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Apr 2, 2011

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