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Shelter From the Storm

Shelter From the Storm EDITORIAL Steven N. Handel ne year after the destruction of life and property from Hurricane Sandy in the eastern United States, government agencies and the professions are trying to plan ahead. Federal and local governments are searching for cost-effective solutions to hold back the tide, to give us all Bob Dylan's apocryphal "shelter from the storm." Green infrastructure, sort of a casual term that very often includes much more than chlorophyll, is on the short list of many possible remedies. How can restoration ecologists play the most useful role? Restored habitats play several useful roles in our coastal drama. They offer protection against tidal surge by dissipating energy and binding soil. They can act as filters, removing particulates and nutrients released from overwhelmed storm and sanitary sewer systems. They can act as windbreaks, absorbing energy before constructed elements fail. They are refuges for coastal wildlife as frantic as people to hide from the horrific weather. They serve as economic drivers, encouraging people to return to the coast to rebuild and to visit despite the physical damage around them. Finally, restored habitats retain a sense of place, the specialness of our coastal areas that inspires and encourages new ways http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Shelter From the Storm

Ecological Restoration , Volume 31 (4) – Nov 4, 2013

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
Publisher site
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Abstract

EDITORIAL Steven N. Handel ne year after the destruction of life and property from Hurricane Sandy in the eastern United States, government agencies and the professions are trying to plan ahead. Federal and local governments are searching for cost-effective solutions to hold back the tide, to give us all Bob Dylan's apocryphal "shelter from the storm." Green infrastructure, sort of a casual term that very often includes much more than chlorophyll, is on the short list of many possible remedies. How can restoration ecologists play the most useful role? Restored habitats play several useful roles in our coastal drama. They offer protection against tidal surge by dissipating energy and binding soil. They can act as filters, removing particulates and nutrients released from overwhelmed storm and sanitary sewer systems. They can act as windbreaks, absorbing energy before constructed elements fail. They are refuges for coastal wildlife as frantic as people to hide from the horrific weather. They serve as economic drivers, encouraging people to return to the coast to rebuild and to visit despite the physical damage around them. Finally, restored habitats retain a sense of place, the specialness of our coastal areas that inspires and encourages new ways

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 4, 2013

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