Seed Transfer Zones for a Native Grass Festuca roemeri : Genecological Evidence

Seed Transfer Zones for a Native Grass Festuca roemeri : Genecological Evidence Abstract: A common-garden study of Festuca roemeri (Pavlick) E. B. Alexeev (Poaceae) revealed substantial genetic variation within and among 47 populations from throughout its range in the Pacific Northwest, US, for growth, fitness, phenological, and morphological traits. Using climatic and physiographic variables, genetic patterns over the landscape were examined through principal component and regression analysis. Elevation and latitude of the seed source, and to a lesser extent temperature and precipitation, explained a significant proportion of the genetic variation, suggesting that observed variation was associated with adaptation to local environments. Most plants from the Willamette Valley exhibited poor growth and survival, perhaps due to inbreeding. Festuca roemeri variation clustered into seed transfer zones corresponding to Level III ecoregions, and one zone was further subdivided. High-elevation populations separated from lower-elevation populations but did not cluster into a single seed zone. Seed transfer zones reported here provide a guide for plant community restoration efforts using this species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Native Plants Journal University of Wisconsin Press

Seed Transfer Zones for a Native Grass Festuca roemeri : Genecological Evidence

Native Plants Journal, Volume 9 (3) – Jan 9, 2008

Loading next page...
 
/lp/university-of-wisconsin-press/seed-transfer-zones-for-a-native-grass-festuca-roemeri-genecological-Zu6MmiyK8o
Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Native Plants Journal Inc
ISSN
1548-4785
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: A common-garden study of Festuca roemeri (Pavlick) E. B. Alexeev (Poaceae) revealed substantial genetic variation within and among 47 populations from throughout its range in the Pacific Northwest, US, for growth, fitness, phenological, and morphological traits. Using climatic and physiographic variables, genetic patterns over the landscape were examined through principal component and regression analysis. Elevation and latitude of the seed source, and to a lesser extent temperature and precipitation, explained a significant proportion of the genetic variation, suggesting that observed variation was associated with adaptation to local environments. Most plants from the Willamette Valley exhibited poor growth and survival, perhaps due to inbreeding. Festuca roemeri variation clustered into seed transfer zones corresponding to Level III ecoregions, and one zone was further subdivided. High-elevation populations separated from lower-elevation populations but did not cluster into a single seed zone. Seed transfer zones reported here provide a guide for plant community restoration efforts using this species.

Journal

Native Plants JournalUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Jan 9, 2008

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off