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Russian Olive Fruit Production in Shelterbelt and Riparian Populations in Montana

Russian Olive Fruit Production in Shelterbelt and Riparian Populations in Montana numbers, vigor and size (George et al. 2013). It is likely that native perennial grasses were present in and prior to 2011 throughout much of the area, but were severely diminished in size and vigor, making them difficult to detect. Perennial grasses (both native and introduced) are the only palatable, green grass at TomKat Ranch during some times of year, making them a targeted forage for livestock and susceptible to being grazed at a frequency that does not allow for adequate shoot and root regeneration and seed set. Hence we are likely documenting an increase in distribution of native perennial grasses as well as an increase in detectability of existing stands. Timing of grazing has been highlighted as the most important aspect in promoting native grass restoration (Menke 1992, George et al. 2013). In the grazing plan described here, the timing of grazing was varied so that the same fields were not grazed during the same phenological period every year. Grazing was not specifically timed to promote native perennial grasses across the whole area but all pastures should have received rest during native grass seed production at least once every two years. We hypothesize that this rest facilitated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Russian Olive Fruit Production in Shelterbelt and Riparian Populations in Montana

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (4) – Nov 3, 2014

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
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Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
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1543-4079
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Abstract

numbers, vigor and size (George et al. 2013). It is likely that native perennial grasses were present in and prior to 2011 throughout much of the area, but were severely diminished in size and vigor, making them difficult to detect. Perennial grasses (both native and introduced) are the only palatable, green grass at TomKat Ranch during some times of year, making them a targeted forage for livestock and susceptible to being grazed at a frequency that does not allow for adequate shoot and root regeneration and seed set. Hence we are likely documenting an increase in distribution of native perennial grasses as well as an increase in detectability of existing stands. Timing of grazing has been highlighted as the most important aspect in promoting native grass restoration (Menke 1992, George et al. 2013). In the grazing plan described here, the timing of grazing was varied so that the same fields were not grazed during the same phenological period every year. Grazing was not specifically timed to promote native perennial grasses across the whole area but all pastures should have received rest during native grass seed production at least once every two years. We hypothesize that this rest facilitated

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

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