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Roots of Chaparral Shrubs Still Fail to Penetrate a GeoSynthetic Landfill Liner after 16 Years

Roots of Chaparral Shrubs Still Fail to Penetrate a GeoSynthetic Landfill Liner after 16 Years Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). of annual herbs (Griffin 1978). The soils are medium- Roots of Chaparral Shrubs Still Fail to grained sands (92–96 percent sand) that are well-drained, Penetrate a GeoSynthetic Landfill Liner and have low organic matter content and fertility (Holl after 16 Years 2002). Mean rainfall is 475 mm per year with high interan- Karen D. Holl (Department of Environmental Studies at the nual variability (275 to 957 mm; National Climate Data University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, kholl@ Center, Asheville, NC). ucsc.edu) and Sean McStay (University of California Fort We planted eight shrub and one tree species separated Ord Natural Reserve, Marina, CA 93933). by 1.5 m on an experimental area with a 40-mil polyeth- ylene geomembrane liner (Poly-Flex Construction, Inc., n the past, legislation in the United States (USEPA Grand Prairie, Texas) covered with approximately 65 cm I1989) and most of Europe (Forster 1993) restricted http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Roots of Chaparral Shrubs Still Fail to Penetrate a GeoSynthetic Landfill Liner after 16 Years

Ecological Restoration , Volume 32 (2) – May 6, 2014

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). of annual herbs (Griffin 1978). The soils are medium- Roots of Chaparral Shrubs Still Fail to grained sands (92–96 percent sand) that are well-drained, Penetrate a GeoSynthetic Landfill Liner and have low organic matter content and fertility (Holl after 16 Years 2002). Mean rainfall is 475 mm per year with high interan- Karen D. Holl (Department of Environmental Studies at the nual variability (275 to 957 mm; National Climate Data University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, kholl@ Center, Asheville, NC). ucsc.edu) and Sean McStay (University of California Fort We planted eight shrub and one tree species separated Ord Natural Reserve, Marina, CA 93933). by 1.5 m on an experimental area with a 40-mil polyeth- ylene geomembrane liner (Poly-Flex Construction, Inc., n the past, legislation in the United States (USEPA Grand Prairie, Texas) covered with approximately 65 cm I1989) and most of Europe (Forster 1993) restricted

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: May 6, 2014

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