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Root Growth Responses to Soil Amendment in an Urban Brownfield

Root Growth Responses to Soil Amendment in an Urban Brownfield Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Egical Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward ioducing innovative research, tos, technogies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Frank J. Gallagher (Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ), Joshua S. Caplan (rresponding author: Department of Egy, Evution & Natural Resources, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, jcaplan@aesop.rutgers.edu), Jennifer Adams Krumins (Department of Biogy and Mecular Biogy, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ) and Jason C. Grabosky (Department of Egy, Evution & Natural Resources, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ). igh metal nceations in soil can act as a strong abiotic filter in plant mnities, iting the establishment, growth, and reproductive capacity of sensitive species (Adriano 1986). However, some species can successfully nize soils ntaminated by metals, often because they have adaptive traits that minimize deleterious physiogical effects. For example, metals may be excluded at the root epidermis (Feng et al. 2013) or sequestered in plant tissue as phytochelatins http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Root Growth Responses to Soil Amendment in an Urban Brownfield

Ecological Restoration , Volume 33 (1) – Feb 18, 2015

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
Copyright
Copyright © University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079
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Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Egical Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward ioducing innovative research, tos, technogies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Frank J. Gallagher (Department of Landscape Architecture, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ), Joshua S. Caplan (rresponding author: Department of Egy, Evution & Natural Resources, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, jcaplan@aesop.rutgers.edu), Jennifer Adams Krumins (Department of Biogy and Mecular Biogy, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ) and Jason C. Grabosky (Department of Egy, Evution & Natural Resources, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ). igh metal nceations in soil can act as a strong abiotic filter in plant mnities, iting the establishment, growth, and reproductive capacity of sensitive species (Adriano 1986). However, some species can successfully nize soils ntaminated by metals, often because they have adaptive traits that minimize deleterious physiogical effects. For example, metals may be excluded at the root epidermis (Feng et al. 2013) or sequestered in plant tissue as phytochelatins

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Feb 18, 2015

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