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Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant Reed Infested Areas in Webb County, Texas

Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant Reed Infested Areas... Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Researchers have tested an array of methods to determine Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the their effectiveness on controlling giant reed with varying Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant success. Current leading methods for control include fire, Reed Infested Areas in Webb County, herbicide treatments (Spencer et. al 2008), mechanical removal, and utilizing biological control agents from giant Texas reed’s native habitat which ranges from the Mediterranean Amede Rubio (corresponding author: Department of Biology to Southern Asia (Goolsby et al. 2009). and Chemistry, Texas A&M International University 5201 There is little information on the potential for passive University Blvd., Laredo, TX, amede.rubio@tamiu.edu), restoration in riparian areas where giant reed has been Alexis E. Racelis (Department of Biology, The University of removed or controlled, based on persistent soil seed bank. Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX), Thomas C. Vaughan In this study, we conducted a seed bank study following http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Restoration University of Wisconsin Press

Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant Reed Infested Areas in Webb County, Texas

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Publisher
University of Wisconsin Press
ISSN
1543-4079

Abstract

Restoration Notes Restoration Notes have been a distinguishing feature of Ecological Restoration for more than 25 years. This section is geared toward introducing innovative research, tools, technologies, programs, and ideas, as well as providing short-term research results and updates on ongoing efforts. Please direct submissions and inquiries to the editorial staff (ERjournal@ aesop.rutgers.edu). Researchers have tested an array of methods to determine Riparian Soil Seed Banks and the their effectiveness on controlling giant reed with varying Potential for Passive Restoration of Giant success. Current leading methods for control include fire, Reed Infested Areas in Webb County, herbicide treatments (Spencer et. al 2008), mechanical removal, and utilizing biological control agents from giant Texas reed’s native habitat which ranges from the Mediterranean Amede Rubio (corresponding author: Department of Biology to Southern Asia (Goolsby et al. 2009). and Chemistry, Texas A&M International University 5201 There is little information on the potential for passive University Blvd., Laredo, TX, amede.rubio@tamiu.edu), restoration in riparian areas where giant reed has been Alexis E. Racelis (Department of Biology, The University of removed or controlled, based on persistent soil seed bank. Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX), Thomas C. Vaughan In this study, we conducted a seed bank study following

Journal

Ecological RestorationUniversity of Wisconsin Press

Published: Nov 3, 2014

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